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Why are new homes not energy efficient?I would like to ask a major housing contractor

Approximately 240,000 new homes are completed each year, most of which have not yet been built with the highest energy efficiency possible.

Eco-certification of our assets has recently been in the limelight as countries around the world promised to reduce carbon emissions at the recent COP26 conference.

The UK Government is leading the promotion of this energy efficiency and has made some policy changes that will ultimately force homeowners to improve real estate that does not meet certain criteria.

The current goal is to reach as many homes as possible with a C rating by 2035 and to accelerate the deadline for buy-to-let properties to 2028.

The UK is on Green Home Drive, but the new builds in the UK have most likely achieved a B energy performance certificate rating rather than an optimal A rating.

Homebuilders play a key role in achieving these goals, given that it is much easier to build a new, energy-efficient home than to refurbish an old one.

It contacted Money’s 10 largest homebuilders in the UK, who are responsible for most of the completed homes, and asked about the EPC rating of new homes.

Half of them didn’t provide a response, suggesting that the industry is lagging behind when it comes to communicating with customers.

The answers we got suggest that most new builds are currently achieving a B rating and therefore will reach their 2035 goal.

However, over time, as home heating and insulation technologies evolve, energy efficiency requirements can become more stringent.

If not, the data show that customers are becoming more motivated to live in more energy-efficient homes.

According to a recent Halifax survey, for example, an A-rated property is worth up to £ 40,000 more than a G-rated home.

The number of A-rated homes under construction appears to account for a small portion of the total homes built, and one builder admits that these are only 10% of production in last fiscal year. ..

EPC is an evaluation scheme that bands properties between A and G based on energy performance, with A being the most efficient and G being the least efficient.

EPC is an evaluation scheme that bands properties between A and G based on energy performance, with A being the most efficient and G being the least efficient.

The three builders also admitted that they are still building some C-rated homes.

Remodeling homes to improve energy efficiency can be costly, so all new homes get an A rating to protect buyers from future upgrade costs and reduce energy costs. There is an argument that it is necessary.

More energy efficient homes mean cheaper mortgages, as lenders are increasingly offering “green mortgages” that give people with a particular EPC rating low interest rates or higher loans. There is also.

The government is discussing the next plan Force lenders to reveal the EPC band of the property they give mortgagesThis means that people with low ratings can have difficulty getting a loan.

We asked homebuilders, some of the UK’s largest companies, five questions about the energy efficiency of homes. Only one – Bellway – is back with all five answers.

What I asked a homebuilder

Here are five questions we asked homebuilders:

1. Is there a minimum energy performance certificate rating that every new home must achieve?

2. What percentage of homes completed in the last fiscal year achieved each EPC rating?

3. When designing a home, how do you determine what features and specifications are needed to meet your target EPC ratings? (Example: insulation level, window type, energy source).

4. If you are building a house that is not designed to reach EPC A, what is the reason?

5. Are there any plans to improve the EPC rating achieved by the property, or more general energy efficiency? what are they?

Four more – Barratt, Bellway, Persimmon, Redrow and Taylor Wimpey provided general comments on energy efficiency.

The countryside and McCarthy & Stone declined to comment, but Berkeley, Bovis Holmes and Crest Nicholson did not respond.

According to the latest UK energy performance certificate data recorded between July and September 2021, 84% of new properties are given an A or B rating and 82% of existing homes are C or D. Was given a rating.

According to the answers, most new homes currently achieve a B energy efficiency rating, but three of the five respondents admit that they are still building homes below C.

Barratt and Bellway were the only homebuilders to confirm that all homes achieved at least B.

Bellway was the only builder to agree to provide a breakdown of EPC ratings.

Last year, 10% of completed homes achieved an A rating and 90% achieved a B rating.

The average EPC is 84, and the score required for B rating is between 81 and 91.

Redrow states that “most” of the house has achieved B or higher, Taylor Wimpey states that the house is “generally” B or higher, and Persimmon states that “almost all” have been rated B or higher. I did.

When asked why they didn’t build a new home to achieve an A rating, most people said that doing so would add too much to the price.

Daniel Hastings, Redrow’s technical manager, said:

“If you prefer through a variety of solutions rather than imposing this as a standard, we recommend that you choose to upgrade your EPC rating to provide better value for money to your customers.”

He added that there are additional options available, such as solar panels, which homeowners can add to their property if they so desire for an additional fee.

Another way to improve the EPC rating of a home is to install an air or underground heat source heat pump instead of a gas boiler.

According to the Center for Sustainable Energy, the typical cost of installing an air heat source heat pump unit is £ 6,500-10,000, depending on the size of the property that needs heating.

One homebuilder, Bellway, said he was considering installing an eco-friendly air heat source heat pump as part of a standard home design. The cost of getting one can be up to £ 10,000

One homebuilder, Bellway, said he was considering installing an eco-friendly air heat source heat pump as part of a standard home design. The cost of getting one can be up to £ 10,000

Neil Jefferson, managing director of the industry association’s Federation of Homebuilders, said no installers were qualified enough to make heat pumps a viable outlook for all new homes.

“Heat pumps are an important technology for new homes, but there are important challenges to overcome, primarily related to the need to increase installation and service skills and capacity,” he said.

“Currently, the number of heat pumps installed is small compared to the number of homes built each year, so capacity needs to be significantly increased.”

Currently, about 30,000 heat pumps are installed every year.

Only Bellway said he was considering installing a heat pump as part of the standard design.

“We are currently trying out air heat source heat pumps to ensure they are properly configured and incorporated into Bellway’s design principles, providing our customers with low CO2 emissions and low running costs.”

Other builders have stated that they will not add more homes to EPCA standards as they are not required by current regulations.

Homebuilders said building a new home using EPCA would increase the cost of the buyer

Homebuilders said building a new home using EPCA would increase the cost of the buyer

The Bellway statement said: ‘Current and future building regulatory thresholds are below the A-band EPC. Some achieve A-band depending on the amount of solar PV and the orientation of the plot.

Taylor Wimpey also said that having a specific EPC rating is not specified by current regulations, but instead follows a “conceptual housing approach.”

This is Money, and I was also asked if the builder was considering improving the EPC band in the future.

Kaki said he had invested in technical testing. “We are investing in a number of technical tests, including” zero carbon ready “houses, to ensure further improvements in energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions. “

Barat also said it was just launched.A zero-carbon home with a new flagship concept that includes technology that will be the blueprint for the future of sustainable living.

As with heat pump testing, Bellway said, “We are conducting a research project to explore which energy efficiency solutions are included in the Future Homes Standard model design and strategy.”

This standard, which will be introduced in 2025, will be used for new homes. It produces 75-80 percent less carbon emissions than homes offered under current regulations.

The test said it focused on ensuring that the new technology achieved the customer’s greatest running cost savings.

“Houses that exceed the proposed Future Homes Standard are being built at several sites in the UK and will monitor the energy performance of these homes to provide insight into their performance in the real environment,” he said. increase.

“The cost of energy is an important issue for many UK homes, so we are testing to find the best alternatives to help achieve these goals, but consumers in everyday home operations. We also take into account the cost of. Away from traditional gas boilers. “

Future housing standards will be introduced in 2025, meaning new homes will need to generate 75-80 percent less carbon emissions than they do today.

Future housing standards will be introduced in 2025, meaning new homes will need to generate 75-80 percent less carbon emissions than they do today.

The Federation of Homebuilders said this was money and the homebuilding industry was “committed” to achieving its energy efficiency goals.

Jefferson said: “The industry is committed to achieving the government’s environmental goals and continues to work with stakeholders to ensure that the Future Homes Standard implementation schedule proposed from 2025 is achieved.

“New homes are already significantly more energy efficient than older homes, saving hundreds of pounds a year for owners and increasing profits as energy prices continue to rise.

“The important thing is to make consumers happy with the new technology, as they will eventually have to buy and live in a new home tomorrow.”

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Why are new homes not energy efficient?I would like to ask a major housing contractor

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