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The Rolling Stones pay tribute to the late drummer Charlie Watts

The Rolling Stones pay tribute to the late drummer Charlie Watts as the legendary band plays improvised jazz at his favorite London jazz club.

  • The band was joined by Charlie’s oldest friends and collaborators Dave Green, Ben Waters and Ronnie Scott’s Axel Zwingenberger on stage.
  • Saxophonist Tim Ries prepared a special song titled Blues for Charlie for the late drummer, and Lisa Fischer sang Trouble on My Mind.
  • Stones concludes the night with R & B standard Shame Shame Shame and Down the Road Apiece
  • Former bandmate Bill Wyman also attended a one-time performance after arriving with his wife Sae Yamamoto.


The Rolling Stones praised their late drummers Charlie Watts We had an intimate gig this week at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in Soho, London.

Rock veteran Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74, reunited with former bassist Bill Wyman, 85, and paid tribute to the musician who died in August at the age of 80 at a special concert hosted by Jools Holland.

The band was joined by Charlie’s oldest friends and collaborators Dave Green, Ben Waters, and Axel Zwingenberger on stage at Charlie’s personal favorite venue.

Tribute: The Rolling Stones celebrated their late drummer Charlie Watts in an intimate gig at Ronnie Scott in Soho this week (Photo: Sir Mick Jagger).

Saxophonist Tim Ries prepared a special song for the late drummer Blues for Charlie, and Lisa Fischer sang a trouble-on-my-mind and gospel duet with Bernard Fowler. rice field.

Stones ended the night with R & B standards Shame Shame Shame and Down the Road Apiece.

Improvisation gigs begin after Mick admits that returning to stage after the death of a friend or bandmate is “very cathartic.”

Give way: Keith Richards was seen entering the legendary Soho venue before the performance

Give way: Keith Richards was seen entering the legendary Soho venue before the performance

Tragedy: Charlie Watts died in August at the age of 80, but his memory remained alive during this week's band's performance.

Tragedy: Charlie Watts died in August at the age of 80, but his memory remained alive during this week’s band’s performance.

At the first show without Charlie after launching a North American no-filter tour, the singer said it was “sad” to be on stage without Charlie, but “really good” to release bottled bottles. Insisted. Raise your emotions.

He said in September:’We were supposed to play last year. I couldn’t do that for obvious reasons because of the pandemic. And I just thought, and I think everyone in the band thought we should just continue.

“After doing the first few shows, I feel really good about it. But we’re glad we’re doing it. That Charlie wanted us to do it. I know. I think the audience wants to do it. They are.

At a good company: Guitarist Ronnie Wood joins his wife Sally outside the London venue

At a good company: Guitarist Ronnie Wood joins his wife Sally outside the London venue

Familiar Face: The band reunites with former bassist Bill Wyman, who arrived with his wife Sae Yamamoto.

Familiar Face: The band reunites with former bassist Bill Wyman, who arrived with his wife Sae Yamamoto.

“And, of course, it’s different, and of course, it’s sad in some respects, etc. But that means you just get out there, sway, feel good, and it’s very cathartic, so really I think it’s good.”

Mick also looked back on the recent time he spent with him in the studio before Charlie died, revealing that he had missed a joke with Charlie.

He added: It’s so strange and then so sad.

“That is, you have a very long time working with such a person, and you know someone very well, their habits and their peculiarities, they know you.

“And there are obviously or other languages ​​in communicating with musicians. So you talk about it. It’s hard to talk about music.

“But that’s why, after this long time, you have this ease of communication to talk to other musicians. It’s very rare. It’s very lonely.”

The iconic band has launched an unfiltered tour in special respect to Charlie of St. Louis.

The gig started with a photo of a late-life star on an empty stage, drum beats, and video board.

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The Rolling Stones pay tribute to the late drummer Charlie Watts

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