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The government cannot shy away from all the blame for the chaos at airports

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The government has cheerfully shifted the blame for the chaotic scenes at British airports to the aviation industry. It’s all their own fault, so the briefing says he should have noticed a surge in foreign holidays, and he was quite happy to get state aid and release the money, laying off thousands of workers he can’t now persuade to return.

Well wait a minute. While it is certainly true that airlines, and in particular airports, have been caught in the leap. They really underestimated, perhaps surprisingly, the famines in Spain and Greece after two years in Wales and Cornwall.

They have also been paying terribly low wages for years – sometimes less than £ 10 an hour – for workers such as baggage handlers.

But the industry is not to blame. Heathrow alone lost more than £ 4 billion in the two years of the pandemic. This, Gatwick and other major UK airports faced an existential financial threat during the ever-changing Covid rules.

Thanks to fairly skilled leadership they survived, but it was very fast. In addition to this, an economy with an acute shortage of labor caused by Brexit and a number of other factors, as well as a protracted security clearance process, and it is not surprising that aviation is struggling to recover.

It’s no consolation for a family who waits for hours to clear security or immigration, or learns that their flight has just been canceled, London’s airports are far from perfect, but they have come a long way after the horrific chaos of “cunning hell” and the snow shame of a decade or more ago..

Instead of petty public accusations, game ministers should work calmly with industry leaders to address the issue. Because, unlike millions of British vacationers, British vacationers, it does not disappear.

The government cannot shy away from all the blame for the chaos at airports

Source link The government cannot shy away from all the blame for the chaos at airports

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