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The court heard that the 40-year-old boy student Rikki Neave’s accused murderer revealed “a wealth of new details.”

When interviewed by police 22 years after the murder, the court heard that the accused murderer of the boy student Rikki Neave gave him “a wealth of new details.”

James Watson was 13 years old, who allegedly strangled a 6-year-old child in the Peterborough Forest, left his body in a “star-shaped” pose 27 years ago, and dumped his clothes in the trash.

Old Bailey heard that the murderer stayed in the victim’s body for an hour and did not try to hide it.

Ricki’s mother Ruth Neave Accidentally accused of his murder And it was cleared by a jury trial in 1996.

The jury heard a sophisticated DNA test used in Ricky’s clothing in the 2015 Cold Case Review and found a “decisive match” with Watson.

Watson, now 40, denied Ricki’s murder between 28 and 29 November 1994.

Rikki Neave in the photo was killed near his home in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, November 28-29, 1994.

James Watson, 40, is being tried for murdering 6-year-old Ricky Nieve in Old Bailey, London.He denies killing a young man in the woods near the home of the victims of Peter Barra in November 1994 and abandoning his body

Ricki was killed near his home in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire on December 5, 1994, and his body was dumped in a nearby forest.

Ricki was killed near his home in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire on December 5, 1994, and his body was dumped in a nearby forest.

Watson said in his first police statement in 1994 that he encountered a “little boy” while walking to his father’s house and had a brief exchange about nearby bargains before parting.

He said he didn’t know Ricky at the time.

Watson, who was re-interviewed by police in July 2015, said:

But a year later, Watson gave another explanation of the meeting with Ricky. There, he “introduced a wealth of new details.”

He told the police:

“I didn’t hold him over the fence, but you held him over the fence and saw the men working.

“Then we left and went down the second hill … we walked here, through these houses on the other side of the house, and across here on my route. I did.

“I’m just guessing he would have picked him up under the hole in his arm and lifted him up onto the fence.

Police continued to seek information for several years after Ricki's murder.

Police continued to seek information for several years after Ricki’s murder.

Ricki's mother, Ruth Neave, was first charged with murdering her son with her husband, Gary Rogers, but was later acquitted.

Ricki’s mother, Ruth Neave, was first charged with murdering her son with her husband, Gary Rogers, but was later acquitted.

Watson of the center told police that he had lifted the excavator overlooking the fence of the excavator before being asked to explain his DNA to the boy's clothes.

Watson of the center told police that he had lifted the excavator overlooking the fence of the excavator before being asked to explain his DNA to the boy’s clothes.

“I couldn’t, I didn’t swear it … I just picked him up from the armpit to the back and as you know for 0.5 seconds or 30 seconds or so I was looking at a bargain that would have lifted him against this fence.

“Yes, I think we’ve seen the people digging there … and we both went away.”

Prosecutor John Price said: To provide an answer to that important question before it is asked by him? “

Prosecutors allege that Watson in the photo saw an episode of a crime watch featuring an investigation that revealed the existence of

Prosecutors allege that Watson in the photo saw an episode of a crime watch featuring an investigation that revealed the existence of “scientific evidence.”

Prosecutors alleged that Watson changed his statement to police between 1994 and 2015.

Prosecutors alleged that Watson changed his statement to police between 1994 and 2015.

Prosecutors claim that Watson's allegations that he lifted Ricki to peep over the fence were incorrect because there was no fence at the location in November 1994.

Prosecutors claim that Watson’s allegations that he lifted Ricki to peep over the fence were incorrect because there was no fence at the location in November 1994.

In a previous interview on the same day, Watson was asked what he had read about the new survey.

He told police he had watched a recent television show of the incident broadcast on BBC Primewatch.

“If the person who strangled and stripped Ricky Neve saw it, he would have heard DCI Wait talk about a new investigation,” Price said.

Prosecutor: “Ricki was a vulnerable child.”

Ricki lived with his mother and two sisters at Welland Estate in Peterborough when he died.

His sister, Rebecca, was eight years old at the time of his death and lived in foster care.

The family is well known to the local social welfare agency, the court heard. Ricky in particular was at risk.

“In September 1993, 14 months before he died, police responded to two reports and went missing with his sister Rebecca just a few days away. Rebecca still lived in her parents’ house at the time. “I did,” Price said.

“At that time, it was not uncommon for Ricki and his sister to come home far past the time they were supposed to be when they came straight from school.

“On September 29, 1993, Rebecca and Ricky did not return home from 20:00 to 7:00 that night.”

The jury heard that he was used by his mother to collect drugs. She was using large amounts of amphetamine sulfate at the time.

“This negligence puts very young people at significant risk,” Price added.

“That’s why I think Ricky Neve was a vulnerable kid.”

“Repeat, Mr. Wight’s remarks have highlighted the possibility of revealing new scientific evidence, though not specified.”

At that time, the jury heard that no DNA match with Watson’s profile had yet been found.

Price added:

“He knew he had put his clothes in the trash.

“He knew he had dealt with it.

“One who knows all the truth, and when he sees and hears, what would the murderer make if he did?

“Did he fear that there was a real risk he was trying to identify years later?”

The court heard that the detective questioned the sudden appearance of a “fence” in Watson’s account.

Price said: The fence was an obstacle.

“He was asked why the change happened.

“He was marking where the fence stood [on a plan]..

“It was at the same northwestern end of the alley … where he pointed out to the police as where he met Ricki at 12:20 on December 5, 1994, but the statement mentions nothing. Did not fence.’

But on that Monday in 1994, there were no fences in the area.

The video footage recorded for a documentary about the incident from November 28th to December 15th of that year proves this, the jury reported.

“There would have been no reason for Watson to pick up Ricki so that he could see the excavator that day,” Price said.

“There were no obstacles that prevented Ricky from seeing it.

“This isn’t the reason Watson’s hands came into contact with Ricky’s clothes that Monday, so I’ll submit it.

“So I don’t know how his DNA was found in the fibers taken from the clothes of a dead child.

“Then I’ll ask you again … how did DNA get there?”

The jury then heard from PC Malcolm Graham, the first co-pilot who found Ricki’s body the morning when he was reported missing.

Showing evidence in a gray suit and a light blue shirt, he said he continued to serve the Cambridge police as a police officer until 2019.

He was part of a team of police officers searching for the missing Ricki, and as part of his efforts he squeezed the forest where his body was finally found.

“I remember that there were about 10 police officers on the team searching.

“We were lined up … we were about 10 yards apart.

“We started walking from east to west.”

Now retired officers have confirmed that a photo sharing Ricki’s body in court shows exactly how he found the six-year-old body of the day.

The body was taken to the morgue, and the court heard that the police officially identified the body the next day with Ricky’s father, Trevor Harvey.

He said he found Ricki’s leg about five minutes after the search began.

“It was very fast.

“I remember calling the sergeant when I was close enough to see the whole body.”

Graham told the jury how police adopted a “dragon lamp”, a high-intensity searchlight, to illuminate the wood during the search.

Watson, whose address has not been determined, has denied the murder.

The trial will continue.

The court heard that the 40-year-old boy student Rikki Neave’s accused murderer revealed “a wealth of new details.”

SourceThe court heard that the 40-year-old boy student Rikki Neave’s accused murderer revealed “a wealth of new details.”

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