World

TCM investigates 18 “problematic” classic films in a new series

Turner Classic Movies explores some of the old Hollywood’s most famous movies in the new series.

On Thursday, Cable Network launched Reframed: Classic Films in the Rearview Mirror. This is a series that examines the “troublesome and problematic” aspects of classics released in the 1920s and 1960s.

Eighteen flicks under the microscope include breakfast at Tiffany, Psycho, Gone with the Wind, My Fairlady, Stagecoach, Jazz Singer, and Seven Brothers’ Seven Bride.

Prior to the start of each film, multiple organizers will take turns to introduce the roundtable and discuss the history and cultural background of the film.

It also warns viewers who have never seen these films about potentially upset moments such as racism, sexism, and portrayal of LGBTQ issues.

HBO Max, a streaming service that broadcasts TCM movies, hasn’t said whether to pull the movie or add a roundtable.

TCM launches a new series called Rearview Mirror Reframe: Classic Movies to explore the “troublesome and problematic” aspects of old Hollywood movies, such as Gone with the Wind for portraying the happy slaves of Old South. It is starting up.Photo: Vivien Leigh is wearing a corset by Hattie McDaniel without leaving with the wind

The 18 films will discuss issues such as racism, sexism, LGBTQ issues, and Mickey Rooney's role as Mr. Yunioshi at Tiffany's breakfast (above).

The 18 films will discuss issues such as racism, sexism, LGBTQ issues, and Mickey Rooney’s role as Mr. Yunioshi at Tiffany’s breakfast (above).

“We know that millions of people love these films,” TCM host Jacqueline Stewart, who participates in many of the conversations, told The Associated Press.

“It’s not about how this should feel about Psycho, or how it should feel about” Gone with the Wind. “

“We are trying to model not only the words” I like this movie. I hate this movie “but also how to have longer and deeper conversations. There is a lot of space in between. “

Professor Stewart of the University of Chicago, who became the channel’s first African-American host in 2019, has spent her career studying classic films, especially silent films and a black audience.

She is directly aware of the tensions of loving films, including racial stereotypes.

“I grew up in a family of people who love classic movies. Well, if you know that maids and moms will appear, how can you love these movies?” Stewart said.

“Well, I grew up around people who can still love movies. You appreciate some parts of it. You criticize the other parts of it. That’s what one can do. Yes, it can actually enrich your cinematic experience.

Every Thursday in March, the rotation host will hold an introduction to a roundtable on the history and context of the film, alerting viewers to upset moments.

Every Thursday in March, the rotation host will hold an introduction to a roundtable on the history and context of the film, alerting viewers to upset moments.

Among the problematic aspects are white actors who play non-white roles or wear blackfaces.

This includes Mickey Rooney’s performance as Mr. Yunioshi at breakfast at Tiffany’s, Sam Jaffe playing the title role of Gunga Din, and Al Jolson wearing a jazz singer’s blackface. It will be.

This choice also allows hosts (Stewart, Ben Mankiewicz, Dave Kalger, Alicia Malone, Eddie Mueller) to think more broadly about Hollywood movies.

In the case of Psycho, the host talks in the film about transgender identity and equating gender fluidity and the meaning of women’s clothing with mental illness and violence.

It also provokes a greater conversation about sexuality in Alfred Hitchcock’s film.

In a conversation with My Fair Lady, they talk about why filmmaking has fewer feminist endings than theatrical performances, and the physical and psychological abuse of Eliza Dolittle by Henry Higgins.

During the My Fair Lady conversation, the host discusses the physical and psychological abuse of Henry Higgins (right, played by Rex Harrison) and Eliza Dolittle (left, played by Audrey Hepburn).

During the My Fair Lady conversation, the host discusses the physical and psychological abuse of Henry Higgins (right, played by Rex Harrison) and Eliza Dolittle (left, played by Audrey Hepburn).

Among the films under discussion is the Jazz Singer, who is considered the first talkie of Al Jolson's blackface routine (above).

Among the films under discussion is the Jazz Singer, who is considered the first talkie of Al Jolson’s blackface routine (above).

For the discussion of the uninvited guests, the host will look at the film side of the black actor Sidney Poitier, which is primarily aimed at the white audience.Photo, left to right: movie Poitiers, Katharine Houghton, Spencer Tracy

For the discussion of the uninvited guests, the host will look at the film side of the black actor Sidney Poitier, which is primarily aimed at the white audience.Photo, left to right: movie Poitiers, Katharine Houghton, Spencer Tracy

Filling her mouth with marbles without feeding her is played for a cute laugh in the movie. Is it a commentary on misogyny, or is it just misogyny?

And on the night of the uninvited guest airing, Stewart talks about her family’s horror about the complex heritage of actor Sidney Poitier, who plays a black man engaged to a white woman.

“His career is very important for how white Americans began to have more empathy and understanding of blacks,” Stewart said.

In the case of Psycho, the host described the film's transgender identity and, as Norman Bates (played by Anthony Perkins), gender fluidity and the implications of dressing women as mental illness and violence. Talk about equating

In the case of Psycho, the host described the film’s transgender identity and, as Norman Bates (played by Anthony Perkins), gender fluidity and the implications of dressing women as mental illness and violence. Talk about equating

“But at the same time, there is an aspect of his film that is clearly aimed primarily at the white audience, which brings all sorts of complexity to black viewers who feel he is not representative of the entire race.

Companies have recently added disclaimers before shows and movies depicting outdated or stereotypical characters and themes.

Also, in some cases, the movie has just become unavailable. Disney states that the 1946 movie “Song of the South” will never appear in Disney +.

Recently, Walt Disney Company has held monthly meetings with women and minority group advocates to explore hundreds of hours of Disney streaming content looking for potentially offensive content. It became clear.

The goal of Reframed Classics is to provide viewers with tools to discuss movies from different eras, rather than simply rejecting or canceling them.

And Stewart doesn’t believe that problematic films can simply be removed from culture.

“I think there is something to be learned from any work of art,” Stewart said.

“They are all historical artifacts that tell us a lot about the industry in which they were created and the culture they were talking about.”

Every Thursday, until March 25, 4-5 movies will be “reframed” from 8 pm Eastern Standard Time.

Problems with each of the 18 movies “reframed” by TCM

March 4th

Gone with the Wind-Romantic portrayal of pre-Civil War southern life before the Civil War and portraying slaves as happy and satisfying w

Seven brides for the seven looting brothers-a sexist controversy over a movie plot to kidnap and force a woman to marry

Rope-Depiction of two queer characters who just committed murder

Four Feathers-A racist view that indicates the Arabs and includes the term “fuzzy wazy” to undertake British imperialism in Arabia

March 11

Women of the Year-Sexism and the idea that women can only succeed in the workplace if they lack femininity

Guess Who’s Coming-The movie side of black actor Sidney Poitier, mainly aimed at white audiences

Gunga Din-White actor Sam Jaffe who plays the title role of the Indian character Gunga Din

Sinbad, Sailor-White actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr. who plays the Arab role and portrayal of the Arabs in Sinbad

Jazz Singer-Al Jolson’s Blackface Routine

March 18

Searchers-White actor Henry Bradon, who plays Native American characters, and the abuse of Native American women by white characters.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s-Depiction of White Actor Mickey Rooney’s Japanese Character Unioshi

Swing Time-Fred Astaire’s Blackface Routine

Stagecoach-Native American depictions and they are considered a threat

Apeman, Tarzan-African portrayal, including a single attack by a tribe of aggressive dwarfs

March 25

My Fair Lady-Sexism and Eliza Doolittle’s Physical and Psychological Abuse by Henry Higgins

Child Time-A depiction of the LGBTQ problem when two female teachers were accused of each other’s sinful sexual knowledge.

Psycho-The Meaning of Identifying Transgender Identity with Women’s Clothing with Mental Illness and Violence

Dragonseed-Katharine Hepburn, a white actress who plays the role of a Chinese woman named Jade

TCM investigates 18 “problematic” classic films in a new series

Source link TCM investigates 18 “problematic” classic films in a new series

Back to top button