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Strictly’s Moti Mabuse says the family comes before work, looking back on growing up under apartheid

Mozzima Views, Popular judge BBCStrictly Come Dancing states that despite his busy schedule, he always makes sure that his family is a top priority.

In an interview with Germanyof BILD der Frau, Mabuse, 40, her husband, Evgenij Voznyuk and her 3-year-old daughter said they are the most important in the world.

“The family always comes first! Everything else is built around it.

Priority: Motsi Mabuse, a popular judge at the BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing, states that despite his busy schedule, he is always making sure his family is a top priority.

“Honestly, what’s left when everything is robbed of me? Of course, my family, my husband and our sweet daughter.

Mabse was born in Klar Hook, now in South Africa, and his family moved to Pretoria at the age of five.

The apartheid system did not allow blacks in the city of Bohr’s home, so her family had to live in nearby Mabopane. Since the street wasn’t even named here, Mabuse lived in Block C and went to Block X’s kindergarten.

Here the family experienced various forms of racism, but she says her parents always encouraged her not to hinder her progress in life.

Adorable: In an interview with BILD der Frau from Germany, Mabuse, 40, said her husband, Evgenij Voznyuk, and her 3-year-old daughter are the most important people in the world.

Adorable: In an interview with BILD der Frau from Germany, Mabuse, 40, said her husband, Evgenij Voznyuk, and her 3-year-old daughter are the most important people in the world.

In her book “Chilliim Blut”, Mabse recalls that her mother was verbally abused by a white woman just by entering a supermarket near Pretoria. But even here, the young Mozzi’s mother told her and her sister never to allow such behavior to threaten her.

“Now don’t make such a shocked face. No matter what this white woman says, she doesn’t have the right to do so.”

“Don’t convince whites that you don’t have a business in a particular place just because you’re black.”

Doting Mom:

Doting Mom: “My daughter is the only black kid in a kindergarten class and I don’t want it to stay this way forever.”

While studying law at the University of Pretoria, Mabse began dancing, participated in competitions and was second in the National Olympics of Latin American Dance in 1998.

In 2003 she married Timo Kurzak, who danced with her at the British Open Championships in Blackpool.

By 2007, the name Motsi Mabuse became famous in Germany based on his participation in the dance show “Let’s Dance” and became a panelist in 2010.

In 2013, Mabuze won the German Latin Dance Contest with Ukrainian dancer Evgenij Voznyuk. A year later, Kulczak and Mabuse divorced, and by 2015 Mabuse revealed that she had a relationship with Voznyuk. The couple got married in June 2017.

Beaming:'Honestly, what's left when everything is robbed of me? Of course, my family, my husband and our sweet daughter

Beaming:’Honestly, what’s left when everything is robbed of me? Of course, my family, my husband and our sweet daughter “(photographed in 2020)

She first came to Germany about 20 years ago, and racism wasn’t an issue, but in 2014 Mabse responded to a brutal attack by a young Syrian on a tram in eastern Germany. Posted on social media.

“Germany, you have a real problem!” She wrote on Instagram. “Germany tries to look good, but ignores many painful voices! This is a reality for many!”

When she considered moving to the UK in September 2021, she said, “My skin color is much more than in Germany.”

“My daughter is the only black kid in kindergarten class and I don’t want it to stay this way forever.”

Throwback: Mabse (second from left) was born in Klarhook, now in South Africa, and her family moved to Pretoria at the age of five.

Throwback: Mabse (second from left) was born in Klarhook, now in South Africa, and her family moved to Pretoria at the age of five.

Having held German citizenship for several years, Mabse says he is doing everything to raise his daughter as lovingly as possible and encourages him to express himself with confidence.

“How” when asked if she would raise a child, she said: “Lovingly. She’s getting attention, we talk a lot.”

“And I’m proud that she can express herself and name her emotions. Many adults can’t do that.”

Tragedy: Under the apartheid system, blacks were not allowed in the city that was the fortress of Bohr, so her family had to live in the nearby Mabopane.

Tragedy: Under the apartheid system, blacks were not allowed in the city that was the fortress of Bohr, so her family had to live in the nearby Mabopane.

Unless you’re busy with your family or running a dance school at a school in Kelkheim, Mabuse can also be careful to eat well and relax. ‘

“Sure, I’m paying attention to a balanced and healthy diet … Previously, when I was dancing professionally, my body only worked, but I really take care of it. did not.”

“Three years ago it gave me my wonderful daughter, and now I want to do good for it. My body is my temple.”

“In addition to the lessons, I try to train my strength and endurance five times a week. I also developed my own training program to teach online.

Family: In her book

Family: In her book “Chilliim Blut” (Chilliim in the blood), Mabuse (right) describes how a mother (Dudu, left) was verbally abused by a white woman once she entered a supermarket near Pretori. I remember (I took a picture with my sister) Oti, center)

Strictly’s Moti Mabuse says the family comes before work, looking back on growing up under apartheid

Source link Strictly’s Moti Mabuse says the family comes before work, looking back on growing up under apartheid

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