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Rural Airbnb landlords may need a license to provide a home for short vacations

Rural Airbnb landlords may need to get a license to provide a home because they are afraid that locals will be kicked out due to a shortage of rental properties on short vacations. ..

  • Second homeowners may need a permit to manage a short vacation permit
  • The proposal is being considered following concerns by popular coastal lawmakers.
  • Following the crackdown announced to those who are abusing the villa tax loophole
  • Holidaylets must be rented for at least 70 days a year at business rates


Airbnb Rural owners may need to obtain a license to provide a home for a short vacation, fearing that the locals will be kicked out due to a shortage of rental properties.

The proposal being considered by the Minister may force a second homeowner to obtain consent from the local council to manage short vacation permits.

The plan is as follows Tory Parliamentarians in popular coastal areas such as Cornwall, Devon, and the Isle of Wight have expressed concern about the booming industry, and there is a shortage of affordable housing in the area.

Government sources said Times: “It is clear that the market needs to respond to the way it has grown rapidly.”

Yesterday, the Level Up Department announced a tax crackdown on villa owners pretending to lend their property to the villa.

Starting April 2023, holidaylets must be rented for at least 70 days a year to be eligible for business fees under the new rules aimed at benefiting tourist destinations.

The proposal being considered by the Minister may force a second homeowner to obtain consent from a local council to manage short vacation permits (Photo: St Ives, Cornwall).

In a Commons debate, North Devon Tory lawmaker Serene Saxby warned that rising home prices are helping homeless people in her community.

She also said Airbnb’s “noise, antisocial behavior, parties, hot tubs” are causing pain to the locals.

Bob Seely, a Tory lawmaker on the Isle of Wight, said the village of Seaview was “virtually stripped of permanent life” because 82% of the property was a villa.

Regarding the latest developments, Level Up Secretary Michael Gove said: ‘The government is supporting small businesses, including responsible short-term rentals that attract tourists and bring significant investment to the community.

“But we support and do not allow privileged people to abuse the system by unfairly claiming tax exemptions and having locals count their costs.

“The actions we take create a more equitable system and ensure that second homeowners contribute their share to the local services they benefit from.”

Yesterday, the Level Up Bureau announced a tax crackdown on villa owners pretending to lend their property to the villa (Level Up Secretary Michael Gove, photographed on January 10).

Yesterday, the Level Up Bureau announced a tax crackdown on villa owners pretending to lend their property to the villa (Level Up Secretary Michael Gove, photographed on January 10).

Kurt Janssen, director of the Tourism Alliance, added: And a holiday house that is vacant for most of the year.

“Tourism is the lifeblood of many small towns and villages, and it is recognized that it maintains the survival of local shops, pubs and attractions.”

According to the Level Up Department, in 2018-19, 3% of UK households reported that they owned a villa, a percentage that hasn’t changed since 2008-09.

The most common reason to own a second home is to use it as a villa or a weekend villa. 35% consider it a long-term investment or income and 16% have used it as a previous home.

An Airbnb spokesperson said:

An Airbnb spokesperson said:

Overall, 57% of second houses are in the UK, 34% are in Europe and 9% are in non-European countries, according to the latest figures.

In the Government Sector UK Housing Survey 2018-19, he said: “Since 2008-09, the proportion of second houses in the UK has increased and the proportion of second houses in Europe and non-Europe has decreased accordingly.”

An Airbnb spokesperson said:

“We take the housing issue seriously and have already submitted a proposal to the government for a host national registration system. We look forward to supporting future consultations.”

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Rural Airbnb landlords may need a license to provide a home for short vacations

SourceRural Airbnb landlords may need a license to provide a home for short vacations

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