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Robert Tanitch reviews Roy Williams’ The Fellowship at the Hampstead Theatre, London

Roy Williams, author of death of EnglandShe writes about what it’s like to be black and British and wonders what it means to be black British?

The characters in his latest play are the children of the Windrush generation and are spread across three generations. The camaraderie takes place in contemporary London.

Two sisters grew up as activists in the 1980s. Decades later, and now in their fifties, they are at odds.

Dawn (Cherelle Skeete) cares for her dying mother and dislikes the white girl her teenage son is dating. Your partner plays the saxophone. He once had an affair with her sister Marcia (Suzette Lewellyn), a high-flying lawyer who is having an affair with a white married politician, and they were involved in a car accident while he was drunk.

The set has a grand sweeping staircase and looks striking, but seems a more appropriate setting for an elegant and artificial aristocratic comedy.

Skeete took on the role of Dawn at very short notice and she still has the script in her hands, but rarely looks at it. The performance is a tour de force. She dances to pop music and has a hilarious monologue that she delivers like a breathtaking number.

Paulette Randall directs and makes the actors yell way too much.

At one point, the audience, who assumed the play was over, gave enthusiastic applause, only to find that it wasn’t over at all and that there was much more to come. The play lasts 2 hours 45 minutes, which is far too long. The final curtain should be where the audience thought it was.

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Robert Tanitch reviews Roy Williams’ The Fellowship at the Hampstead Theatre, London

Source link Robert Tanitch reviews Roy Williams’ The Fellowship at the Hampstead Theatre, London

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