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Robert Tanitch reviews Al Smith’s rare earth elements at the Royal Court Theater in London

Al Smith’s comedy is about mental health, climate change, ownership of large corporations and land, pollution of the environment, damage from the powerful tech industry, and much more.

We all agree that climate health must be affordable for everyone. There are many people who want to save the earth and become rich.

The action is set in South America in the salt fields of Bolivia. Members of the indigenous community (Carlo Alban) sit on one of the most valuable substances on the planet. 70% of the world’s lithium is under its salt plains. He has a 12-year-old daughter who has died of a blood cancer caused by lithium.

Many people want chemical elements. There are also threats of negotiation, fraud, double crossing and even salary cuts. The rich have power and pressure. Ethics could not take the risk. After all, business is business.

There are lies, blackmail, bribes, and fraud. Give the price a name. Like everyone else, scholars can be corrupted, in which case they are purchased to rewrite history.

Whose self-interest is most useful? A doctor (Genevieve O’Reilly), director of the National Institute of Psychiatry, wants lithium for medicinal purposes. There is a billionaire CEO (Arthur Darvill) who wants it in the electric vehicle industry. There is a local politician (Jayne Griffiths) who has the ambition to be president, and she also wants to mine, process, sell, and get rich.

Hamish Pilly’s vibrant and entertaining production lasts over three hours and can be edited. The cast, including Marcello Cruz and Ian Poulter, is amazing.

The CEO of Arthur Darvill is a caricature of everyone who has a big big ego and has money, can be anyone and do whatever he wants to do. Derville is very interesting and brings a lot of energy to play.

He struck the Royal Court Theater during the rehearsal and pointed out that there is nothing that can be considered anti-Semitic about Al Smith’s cynical play and the protagonist he created, given the controversy reported in the newspaper. need to do it. Semi-tic. The Jewish name of the CEO, who offended many, has changed.

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Robert Tanitch reviews Al Smith’s rare earth elements at the Royal Court Theater in London

Source link Robert Tanitch reviews Al Smith’s rare earth elements at the Royal Court Theater in London

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