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Robert Hardman: How David Berkeley, who died at the age of 86, grew into half the twins of the British media mogul

Even if Sir David Berkeley did his best not to tell anyone, he was the ultimate success story of Suckerite. A backstreet workaholic boy who graduated from school at the age of 14 and built one of the great businesses with his twin brothers, the Empire of his time.

It included great hotels, fleets, breweries, fortified island hideouts, and the Daily Telegraph.

So, at twilight in her life, Sir David Berkeley and Sir Frederick were happy to help when Mrs Thatcher needed a helping hand.

Not only did they bankroll the heroine, but before she died in 2013, she ensured that she would spend her last days in their most spectacular address, the suite at the Ritz Hotel in London.

Now, after a brief illness, the famous hermit Sir David died at the age of 86. He left a widow, four sons and nine grandchildren.

JPictured: Co-owner of The Daily Telegrapher David Berkeley (left) and his twin brother Surfrederick after receiving the Knights from the Queen at Buckingham Palace in 2000.

Sir David Berkeley and his wife Zoe Newton at the time and Aidan, a newborn baby in 1956.

Sir David Berkeley and his wife Zoe Newton at the time and Aidan, a newborn baby in 1956.

He also leaves his twin brothers, who he has been inseparable for most of his life, to the end with a strange and painful rift.

But the details remain unclear, as many do so for the simple reason that Sir David liked it that way.

For years, he refused to submit information to anyone to whom. Even today, his entry, like the twin entry, does not include parents, wives (two), children, hobbies, or even date of birth details.

It simply lists a series of supervisors, along with the honors the brothers were most proud of.

In 2000, they both went to Buckingham Palace and were knighted by the Queen for charitable service. They never overcame philanthropy, but it reached tens of millions.

This opportunity was impressive for two reasons. First, it meant a rare sighting they were with (wearing the same purple tie).

Barclays has purchased an apartment complex on a rocky brecrop outcrop off the Channel Islands of Sark. They bought the island for £ 2.3 million in 1993 and built a neo-Gothic mansion-like fortress.

Barclays has purchased an apartment complex on a rocky brecrop outcrop off the Channel Islands of Sark. They bought the island for £ 2.3 million in 1993 and built a neo-Gothic mansion-like fortress.

Second, the Queen performed the only double night in her living memory. Both Barclays were able to kneel side by side to receive praise, rather than line up one after another.

It was probably the highest point of their partnership. Ten years later, cracks began to emerge, culminating in a buggy conversation in court last year and an astonishing story of a toxic feud between the younger generation of the Berkeley dynasty.

The rift followed the decision of Sir David’s sons to sell Ritz to Sheikh, Qatar. This was contrary to the wishes of Sir Frederick and his daughter, who believed that a better deal would be made than the reported price of around £ 750m.

The fact that one of Sir David’s sons eavesdropped on much of Sir Frederick’s conversation made things more toxic.

I understand that the brothers had some reconciliation shortly before Sir David’s death, but that meant the unfortunate final chapter of his life.

Still, he wasn’t quite unfamiliar to anyone who filled the library with a leather copy of all the legal action he pursued in his life. It’s a big library.

The Queen with David Barclay (center) and Frederick Barclay (right) at the opening of The Scotsman Publications Ltd's new headquarters in Edinburgh.

The Queen with David Barclay (center) and Frederick Barclay (right) at the opening of The Scotsman Publications Ltd’s new headquarters in Edinburgh.

David Lowat Berkeley was born on October 27, 1934 in Hammersmith, West London, 10 minutes before Frederick.

During the wartime evacuation, the twins demonstrated their early talent in business by asking farmers to take care of their bicycles on Market Day.

They were 13 when their father, a Scottish-born traveling salesman, died and left 10 children.

After first finding a job in General Electric’s accounting department, David waved for a strange job and, along with Frederick, did a failed corner shop business.

In the early 1960s, they founded a real estate agent in Notting Hill, London, but at the time it wasn’t like the excursion of today’s Chichibunker.

At the same time, David met and married model Zoe Newton. He had three boys (a divorce in the 1980s gave birth to a second wife and a fourth son).

Berkeley Brothers Frederick Berkeley (L) (Purple Tie) and David Berkeley (R) (Blue Tie)

Twin brothers David and Frederick Berkeley

Barclays purchased the telegraph in 2004. This caused disagreement between the brothers, as Sir David loved it and Sir Frederick regarded it as an expensive vanity project.

By the early 1970s, the brothers had 15 hotel stables, including a hotel in Park Lane. Indeed, their careers were beginning to reflect a monopoly marathon game.

During the 1974 recession, there was almost ruin. Nevertheless, they succeeded in further expanding the hotel empire.

By the time Mrs Thatcher was in Downing Street, they were keen on upgrading. The purchase of Ellerman, a conglomerate of shipping and breweries in 1983, for £ 47m will promote him to the first division of the company.

The timing was spot-on and cultivated a new insatiable city appetite when they whiplashed the pub side of the business at five times the purchase price.

By the 1990s, they had spent a lot of time in Monaco, where they had a yacht, Lady Beatrice, named after her mother.

Together with the same twin, Sir Frederick Berkeley (right), Sir David (left) launched a business empire and became one of Britain's wealthiest men with an estimated £ 7 billion in shared wealth. Ta

Together with the same twin, Sir Frederick Berkeley (right), Sir David (left) launched a business empire and became one of Britain’s wealthiest men with an estimated £ 7 billion in shared wealth. Ta

So they helped another foreign dynamo, one Philip Green, as he was building a fashion empire. All the while, they stuck to that lifelong mantra: no publicity.

At the same time, they made two decisions that set them apart from regular richlist diets.

They bought 160 acres of Channel Islands, Brecqhou, and built a fairy tale fortress on its wind-swept rocks, befitting a James Bond movie.

They also laid the foundation for a new media empire. This began with the purchase of a European newspaper in 1992, followed by Scottsman and the Sundae business.

However, they made it to the top table on Fleet Street in 2004 and won many competitions to buy the Telegraph Group for £ 665m.

It will cause discrepancies between siblings. Sir David has always loved the newspaper industry, but Sir Frederick was said to see it as a costly vanity project. He was more interested in hotels.

From Monaco’s Mirabeau (both honorary ambassadors) to Clarridge’s portfolio, the collection had one unparalleled crown gem. It’s Ritz.

Purchased for £ 75m in 1995 was Ritz, who loved to entertain friends such as Mrs Thatcher. And it was Ritz who finally pulled them apart.

“In every deal with him, I found Sir David nothing but fair and decent,” said Andrew, a former editor and TV presenter who worked with his brother for 25 years. Neil says.

“Honestly, I never imagined that something could come between them, so it’s good to know that they’ve settled.”

So did they finally fix things? We probably never know. Indeed, from the next world, you can almost hear celestial bodies: “no comment”.

Robert Hardman: How David Berkeley, who died at the age of 86, grew into half the twins of the British media mogul

SourceRobert Hardman: How David Berkeley, who died at the age of 86, grew into half the twins of the British media mogul

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