Health

Research suggests that people are eating smarter than previously thought

People They may be smarter than previously thought, as new research reveals that they choose the right size portions of high-calorie foods.

Research Has been shown to moderately reduce the amount of energy-rich foods people eat.

The findings, led by the University of Bristol, confirm a long-held belief that people are prone to eating the same amount of food (by weight), whether they are rich in energy or poor in energy.


It is noteworthy that this study indicates the degree of nutritional intelligence during which people are able to adjust the number of high energy density options consumed.

Annika Flynn, University of Bristol

Researchers suggest that the study is particularly important because it calls into question the common belief among scientists that humans have a tendency to consume excessive caloric foods.

This idea comes from previous studies that manipulated low and high energy versions of the energy content of foods or dishes.

People were not told to eat the low or high energy version, and the findings showed that they were prone to eating the same weight, resulting in higher calorie intake with the high energy version.

Lead author Annika Flynn, Ph.D. in Nutrition and Behavior at the University of Bristol, said: “For years we believed that people recklessly ate energy-rich foods.

“It is noteworthy that this study indicates the degree of nutritional intelligence in which people are able to adjust the amount of high-energy-density options they consume.”

The new study looked at experimental data used in normal, everyday meals with different energy densities, such as chicken salad sandwich with fig roll cakes or porridge with blueberries and almonds.

The experiment involved 20 healthy adults who were temporarily housed in a hospital ward where they were given a variety of dishes for four weeks.

The researchers calculated the calories, grams and energy density (calories per gram) for the food consumed by each participant.

Surprisingly, they found that with greater energy density, a turning point was observed when people began to respond to an increase in calories by reducing the amount of food they consumed.

The researchers said this indicates that there was an previously unknown sensitivity to the energy content of the food that humans ate.

Ms. Flynn said, “For example, people ate smaller portions of cream cheese pasta, which is an energy-rich food, than salads with many different vegetables, which are relatively energy-poor.”

Co-author Jeff Brunstrom, a professor of experimental psychology at the University of Bristol, said: “This study adds to the idea that people are ultimately not passive overeaters, but show a keen ability to assess how rich they are in energy. The food they consume.

“This work is particularly exciting because it reveals the hidden complexity of how people interact with modern energy-rich foods, which we call ‘food intelligence.’

“What it tells us is that we do not seem to be consuming these foods passively, and therefore the reason why they are associated with obesity is more nuanced than previously thought.

“Right now, at least, it offers a new perspective on the long-term issue and opens the door to important new questions and future research.”

The findings are published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Research suggests that people are eating smarter than previously thought

Source link Research suggests that people are eating smarter than previously thought

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