United Kingdom

Police say three women reporting spikes did not take the drug

Detectives investigating three cases of women reporting needle spikes while on the night out in Excelter said forensic tests did not find evidence of date rape drugs in their system. ..

The three women were in the Exeter bars and nightclubs during the week and reported feeling sick.

Devon and Cornwall police took samples from each of the three women who underwent a toxicology test, but found no evidence of spikes or “drugs otherwise”. ..

Officers said they wanted to reassure women and give them “safety.”

According to The Times, the fourth petitioner was “outside the forensic window.” In other words, it was impossible to test her blood and urine because it was too long since she was suspected of taking the drug.

Officers began an investigation after the woman reported that she had been “targeted for needle-based assault or spiked a drink.”

A police spokesperson said:

Four women in Exetter approached police this week after reporting that they might have soared while in Exetter’s nightclub. Police found no evidence of date rape drugs in three women, but the fourth reported an incident that was allegedly too late to retrieve a sample of the drug (photo presented by the model).

Kirsty Howells, 25, shared a photo from a hospital bed in Swansea one night after being spiked in Swansea.

Kirsty Howells, 25, shared a photo from a hospital bed in Swansea one night after being spiked in Swansea.

Originally from Swansea, Kirsty enjoyed a drink earlier this month when an unknown substance was spiked and unconscious.She she "Very shivered" and now "concern" I will go out for a drink again soon.

She said she was

Originally from Swansea, Kirsty enjoyed a drink earlier this month when an unknown substance was spiked and unconscious. She said she was “very upset” and now “always eager to go drinking again.”

This is after 25-year-old Kirsty Howells was unknowingly portrayed in a hospital bed after being “injected with ketamine” in a series of women who reported being “spiked” by injections at a nightclub. ..

Miss Howells posted a photo taken at the hospital after a night out in Swansea.

It was shared on Facebook by her aunt that Howells was believed to have been “injected with ketamine” before she was rushed to A & E by her boyfriend.

Brighton Chief Justin Bartenshaw talks to two victims who feel sick after spending the night in the city on Tuesday night, October 19th and early Wednesday morning, October 20th. He said he was.

He said:’They suspect they were injected. They are supported by officers.

“We are still in the very early stages of our investigation and have received many inquiries.

“We take all reports incredibly seriously and ask anyone who believes to be a victim or witness to Spike to contact us. Also online or We recommend that you report any suspicious behavior via 101 or by calling 999 in an emergency.

Ilana El-baz, 20, recalled that she remained semi-paralyzed on the stairs after returning home from a nightclub in Bristol three weeks ago.She shared a recording taken by her boyfriend showing that she was having a hard time rolling her eyes and climbing the stairs as her head fell on the railing.

Ilana El-baz, 20, recalled that she remained semi-paralyzed on the stairs after returning home from a nightclub in Bristol three weeks ago.She shared a recording taken by her boyfriend showing that she was having a hard time rolling her eyes and climbing the stairs as her head fell on the railing.

Police officers are increasing patrols as part of their ongoing work to crack down on the night economy and will work closely with partners and licensed facilities on initiatives to keep patrons safe.

Ch Supt Burtenshaw added:

“Everyone should be able to enjoy it safely, and there are police officers who patrol the city on weekends to support this.

“Our licensing team is working hard with the venue to raise awareness about spikes and ensure that appropriate measures are taken to prevent this from happening.”

Recently, many women have shared their experiences with Spike, including 20-year-old Ilana El-baz, who remembered being “half-paralyzed” on the stairs after returning home from a nightclub in Bristol three weeks ago. I am.

Today, two teenagers, 18 and 19, were arrested in Nottingham “on suspicion of a conspiracy to administer poison,” and a 35-year-old man was arrested last night on suspicion of possessing drugs. Lincoln.

Students plan to boycott nightclubs as part of a national protest next week, forcing more than 30 universities to participate in the campaign and strengthen security measures at the venue.

Following reports of needle spikes in Nottingham, more than 130,000 people have signed a petition claiming to be a nightclub’s “legal requirement” to “thoroughly” search for customers on arrival.

The Girls Night-in Campaign will spread to 43 university towns and cities in the next two weeks. This corresponds to the reported increase in “spike” drinks and the new alarming tendency for girls to be unknowingly injected with drugs.

The victim became severely ill while on the go and noticed that he had been injected when he found a “pin stab” mark on his body.

Boycott participants are at home on designated nights to raise awareness of attacks and encourage venues to improve security.

A brief survey by The Alcohol Education Trust also reveals new numbers showing that 15% of women, 7% of men, and 17% of those identified as others have surged in drinks.

Opened for a week starting October 12, with 747 responses, the survey asked, “Do you think one of your drinks has been spiked?”, 94 answered “yes”, and an additional 26. Answered “Maybe”.

What do experts say about reporting infusion spikes?

Could you?

Yes-and there are credible reports that people have awakened with spiked needle marks.

However, according to one medical consultant, it is “very unlikely” that it could be a widespread phenomenon.

David Caldicott, an emergency medical consultant and founder of the drug testing project WEDINOS, told VICE News:

“It’s really hard to stab someone unknowingly, especially if you have to hold the needle there for enough time, perhaps 20 seconds, to inject enough medicine to cause this. . “

Could someone really get the injection fast?

Yes-but thExperts say it requires very powerful drugs to be careful.

GHB is one of the most well-known “date rape” drugs and is self-administered in small doses by people as a recreation.

But Guy Jones, a senior scientist at the drug charity The Loop, told VICE that it would be a “poor candidate” for injections because of the large amount of water needed.

‘Therefore (it will be needed) a thick and painful needle. This means that the substances involved will be highly detectable in toxicological screening for several days, “he said.

Adam Winstock, director of the Global Drug Survey, added:

“What you see in a movie is not real. People need to keep their drinks nearby, avoid stealing drinks from strangers, and keep an eye out for their peers.

Can the drug be given to any part of the body?

Yes-but some parts are more effective than others

Jones told VICE: ‘If the drug can be injected non-intravenously, there are certain injection sites that do not work well.

“The back is one of these inappropriate sites due to its low fat muscle content and high levels of pain receptors.”

How about drink spikes?

Infusion spikes are still possible, but drink spikes are much more common.

Drink surge incidents in the UK increased by 108% between 2015 and 2018, with 179 incidents in 2017 alone.

This is only an officially recorded number and can be much higher as it is common not to report it to the police.

Charity Link Aware Advice: “Don’t accept drinks from strangers. If available, use a drink stopper available online at the top of the bottle.”

Rohypnol (or Roofie) and Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) are the most commonly known “date rape” drugs.

Recreational drugs such as ecstasy, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), ketamine, and other “party drugs” may be used to spike alcoholic beverages.

Police say three women reporting spikes did not take the drug

SourcePolice say three women reporting spikes did not take the drug

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