United Kingdom

Norwegian glaciers melt and release a 500-year-old fully preserved wooden box with candles

Archaeologists say the 500-year-old crates, found in full preservation when the Norwegian glaciers melted, contain the remains of the beeswax candles used by the Vikings to find their farms. Announced.

Archaeologists removed the hard lid of a pine box with a leather strap found in the Lendbreen ice region of Norway and discovered the candles that were essential to the Viking hundreds of years ago.

The team suggests that the box, first discovered in 2019, was used to carry the long candles that the Vikings used to illuminate the path between the main farm and the summer farm.

The Lendbreen Glacier Zone has been a popular destination for archaeologists since the team discovered thousands of artifacts protruding from the melting of Norwegian glaciers in 2011.

Video scrolls down

A glacier melting in Norway’s Lendbreen Glacier reveals an ancient crates that have been sealed for up to 500 years, and archaeologists have opened the lid to reveal the remains of beeswax candles.

Initially, the team thought it was a tinderbox that was accidentally lost in the pass, but further analysis revealed that it wasn’t. History blog I will report.

“Radiocarbon dating dates from 1475 to 1635 AD, 400 to 500 years ago,” said a glacier archaeologist from the Ice Secret Team. statement..

The contents of the box were analyzed at the Oslo Cultural History Museum.

“What you see in the box is very likely the wreckage of a beeswax candle.”

The team suggests that this box was used to carry the long candles that the Vikings used to illuminate the path between the main farm and the summer farm.

The team suggests that this box was used to carry the long candles that the Vikings used to illuminate the path between the main farm and the summer farm.

Climate change has created valuable archeology in Norway. This archeology was an ancient passage that was used by the Vikings for thousands of years and is littered with forgotten artifacts. Lendbreen's ice block has produced over 6,000 artifacts since archaeologists began exploring the area.

Climate change has created valuable archeology in Norway. This archeology was an ancient passage that was used by the Vikings for thousands of years and is littered with forgotten artifacts. Lendbreen’s ice block has produced over 6,000 artifacts since archaeologists began exploring the area.

Candleboxes were a common item among the Vikings used to store expensive beeswax candles when the Vikings traveled to various farms.

The melting of glaciers brought about by climate change has created valuable archaeological sites in Norway. The site was an ancient passageway that was used by the Vikings for thousands of years and is littered with forgotten artifacts.

Lendbreen’s ice block has produced over 6,000 artifacts since archaeologists began exploring the area.

Last November, the team unearthed nearly 70 arrow shafts and shoes, textiles, and reindeer bones on the hillside of Yotunheim, about 240 miles from Oslo.

Last November, the team unearthed nearly 70 arrow shafts and shoes, textiles, and reindeer bones on the hillside of Yotunheim, about 240 miles from Oslo.

Last November, the team unearthed nearly 70 arrow shafts and shoes, textiles, and reindeer bones on the hillside of Yotunheim, about 240 miles from Oslo.

Clothing, tools, equipment and animal bones were also discovered by the team in the Norwegian mountains.The photo is an ancient snowshoe

Clothing, tools, equipment and animal bones were also discovered by the team in the Norwegian mountains.The photo is an ancient snowshoe

Based on radiocarbon dating, the oldest arrow dates around 4100 BC and the latest is 1300 AD.

According to the journal, clothing, tools, equipment and animal bones were also found by the team in the Norwegian mountains. Ancient..

Investigators collected more than 100 crafts on-site, including horseshoes, wooden whisks, canes, wooden needles, mittens, and small iron knives.

These extraordinary relics are emerging in a warming world, but archaeologists are at odds with time as ice continues to preserve them.

Archaeologist Regular Gubler told AFP in October 2020, “This is a very short time. Within 20 years, these discoveries will disappear and these ice patches will disappear.

“I’m a little nervous.”

She explained that materials such as leather, wood, birch bark and textiles can be destroyed by erosion.

And the only reason they continue to be preserved is because of the ice.

The Viking era lasted from 700 to 1110 AD

The Viking era in European history was from 700 to 1100 AD.

During this period, many Vikings left their hometown of Scandinavia and traveled by longboat to other countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland.

When the British people first saw the Viking longboats, they came down to the shore to welcome them.

However, the Vikings fought the locals, stealing from churches and burning buildings.

The British people called the invaders “Dans”, but they came not only from Denmark but also from Norway and Sweden.

The name “Viking” comes from a language called “Old Norse” and means “pirate attack”.

The first Viking raid recorded in the Anglo-Saxon chronology was around 787 AD.

It was the beginning of a fierce struggle between Anglo-Saxon and the Vikings.

Norwegian glaciers melt and release a 500-year-old fully preserved wooden box with candles

SourceNorwegian glaciers melt and release a 500-year-old fully preserved wooden box with candles

Back to top button