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Northern Ireland: Why did violence occur and why now? | UK News

More than a week of anxiety rocked Northern Ireland, and police described it as the worst violence in years in the country.

55 police officers Injured person A Molotov cocktail was thrown into a bus carrying passengers Belfast On Wednesday night.

The riot involved a 12-year-old child.

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The moment bus bombed in Belfast

What’s going on

Violence broke out on March 29 in the Loyalist area of ​​Londonderry.

Since then, protests have been held at Loyalist sites around the world almost every night. Northern Ireland, Mostly young people are throwing bricks, Molotov cocktails and fireworks at police officers.

Delhi, Ballymena, Carrickfergus, Newtownabbey, and the capital Belfast have all witnessed violence in the past week.

On Wednesday, anxiety escalated into a clash between denominations over the “peace wall” in western Belfast. It divides primarily the Protestant Loyalist region from the predominantly Catholic nationalist region.

Nationalists want Northern Ireland and Ireland to be united, but Loyalists prefer to keep the country in the United Kingdom.

People are standing next to the fire in the streets of Belfast
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People are standing next to the fire in the streets of Belfast

A gate dividing the two Belfast communities was plunged, police officers and photographers were attacked, a bus with passengers was hijacked as the driver tried to leave the scene, and a Molotov cocktail was bombed.

An unauthorized parade organized on social media will be reported this weekend, approaching the 23rd anniversary of the signing of the Good Friday Agreement.

Sporadic outbreaks of street violence have occurred since the peace agreement ended the “trouble.” It saw decades of Catholic-Protestant bloodshed over the situation in an area where more than 3,000 people died.

But recent anxieties have been “on a scale not seen in the last few years,” said Constable Jonathan Roberts, assistant chief of the Police Service of Northern Ireland.

Smoke a big wave in the neighborhood of Belfast after the bus fired in another night's violence.
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Smoke a big wave in the neighborhood of Belfast after the bus fired in another night’s violence.

What is the reason for your anxiety?

Brexit Claim COVID-IRA funeral rule violations are given for two reasons.

Unionist leaders have accused the growing tensions of cross-border Loyalists in the Irish Sea, effectively imposed by the UK’s Brexit agreement.

A large number of people gathered for the funeral procession of Bobby Story
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A large number of people gathered for the funeral procession of Bobby Story

The Northern Ireland Protocol was devised to avoid the harsh border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, which means that Northern Ireland remains in the EU Single Market and Customs Union.

This meant that products from the UK had to go through EU import procedures at a port in Northern Ireland instead, resulting in delays and sparse supermarket shelves.

Unionists say this jeopardizes Northern Ireland’s constitutional position in the United Kingdom.

The Brexit border issue has been going on since January, when it came into effect, but funerals also seem to have caused violence.

A2 graffiti outside Belfast's Calik Fergus. The Democratic Unionist Party rejected allegations of increasing tensions over Irish Sea trade to abolish Brexit's controversial Northern Ireland Protocol. Mandatory under the Protocol, physical inspection of goods entering Northern Ireland from the United Kingdom was interrupted in the threat and intimidation of staff. Shooting date: Wednesday, February 3, 2021.
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Anger over the Northern Ireland Protocol has boiled
A woman passes the graffiti saying,
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A woman passing by graffiti in Belfast city center in Northern Ireland saying “There is no Irish sea border”

Unionists are angry after police said in March that they would not prosecute Sinn Féin leaders who want United Ireland for violating COVID regulations at the funeral of former IRA intelligence chief Bobby Story last June. ..

Approximately 2,000 mourners lined up on the street, including Deputy Prime Minister Michelle O’Neill, because strict COVID restrictions prevented people from gathering in public.

Three months after the funeral, Ms. O’Neill, who refused to call for resignation, admitted that the government’s public health message was “damaged” by the controversy.

Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. June 30, 2020. Sinn Féin's Michelle O'Neill will address the mourners at the Milltown Cemetery in western Belfast for the funeral of the veteran Republican Bobby Story, who died in England last week. Thousands were lined up on Tuesday as a funeral was held on behalf of a former major IRA person on the way from his home in Andersonstown to the Chapel of St. Agnes near western Belfast. .. Mr Stor Credit: Irish Eye / Alamy Live News-Image ID: 2C52H5R (RM)
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Sinn Féin’s Michelle O’Neill addressed the mourners at the Bobby Story funeral last June.

Who is violent?

There are no clear signs that organized groups are organizing violence.

However, anxiety is concentrated in areas where criminals associated with Loyalist paramilitaries have a great influence.

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“Paramilitary involvement” being actively investigated by NI

Most of the violence took place in groups of 20 to 40 people, but police said more than 600 people had “gathered” after the bus was attacked Wednesday night.

“Children aged 13 or 14 were encouraged and supported by adults who stood up and applauded and cheered,” said Assistant Chief Constroverts.

He said there was an “element of pre-planning” and that there were “equally large numbers” of people from both sides of the political division.

The involvement of paramilitary organizations is an “active research line” and potential “orchestration” is also being considered, “he added.

In further anxiety, a car passes by the wreckage of the Translink Metrobus, which is on fire at Shankill Road in Belfast. Shooting date: Wednesday, April 7, 2021.
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In further anxiety, a car passes by the wreckage of the Translink Metrobus, which is on fire at Shankill Road in Belfast. Shooting date: Wednesday, April 7, 2021.

In other parts of the world, children are suspicious of being involved in violence and being organized behind the scenes by sinister elements.

Increasing evidence suggests that the Ulster Defense Association (UDA) and the Ulster Volunteer secession faction allow continued anxiety.

Experts suggest that Southeastern Antim UDA Loyalist paramilitary organizations involved in organized crime may have taken advantage of the opportunity to return to police after a recent crime crackdown in the area surrounding Calikfargas. There is.

Riot police are depicted on Sunday in the suburbs of Belfast
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Riot police are depicted on Sunday in the suburbs of Belfast

How did people react to violence?

Assistant Chief Constroverts said Wednesday night violence was the most severe of the years and could be an “imminent loss of life.”

The Police Service of Northern Ireland said violence “could retreat our society for years” and thought such cases were “trusted to history.”

Riot clashes with police in Belfast's Sandy Row area
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Riot clashes with police in Belfast’s Sandy Row area

Northern Ireland Executive said it had united five parties to uphold law and order, accusing the “depressing” riots and saying that the use of children was “child abuse.”

Parliament Stormont was recalled to discuss violence during the Easter break and a motion was passed calling for an immediate end to the turmoil.

Democratic Unionist Prime Minister Arlene Foster warned that Northern Ireland “is facing serious political challenges in the future.”

“We should all know that when politics is perceived as a failure, those who fill the void cause despair,” she told Stormont.

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Northern Ireland’s violence “must be stopped,” Foster says

Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis visited Belfast for an emergency meeting on Thursday, admitting that the Northern Ireland Protocol caused a “real problem.”

He told the administration: “The way to deal with these things is through democratic, diplomatic and political processes.

“There is no justification for violence to address any of these issues.”

Irish Prime Ministers Micheál Martin and Boris Johnson called to calm down after speaking on the phone Thursday afternoon.

Northern Ireland: Why did violence occur and why now? | UK News

Source Northern Ireland: Why did violence occur and why now? | UK News

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