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Norman Jewison and Lee Grant say Sidney Poitier’s famous slap scene “sounded all over the world.”

Norman Jewison and Lee Grant of the In the Heat of the Night say that Sidney Poitier’s famous slap scene “sounded all over the world” after its release.


Norman Jewison and Lee Grant look back on the second half Sidney PoitierSlap scene during an interview in the 1967 special feature “In the Heat of the Night” Man It was published on Saturday.

During the sit-in, the feature director and leading actress praised the performer’s acting ability and professionalism while working on the feature.

Legendary actor died at home Los Angeles Last Thursday, 94 years old.

In retrospect, Norman Jewison and Lee Grant looked back at Sidney Poitier’s slap scene in the 1967 In the Heat of the Night feature during an interview with People on Saturday.

In the special feature, Poichie portrays Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs involved in an investigation into a murder in Mississippi.

In the acclaimed slap scene, Tibs visited the residence of Larry Gates’ farm owner Endicott and asked for information he could provide regarding the incident.

Endicot continued to show off his racist tendencies, slapping the detective all over his face after being questioned.

Tibbs slapped the farm owner shortly after the enemy made his last racist remark.

Storyline: In the feature, Poichie portrays Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs, who becomes involved in an investigation into a murder in Mississippi.

Storyline: In the feature, Poichie portrays Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs, who becomes involved in an investigation into a murder in Mississippi.

In the movie: During the highly acclaimed slap scene, Tibs visited the residence of plantation owner Endicott, depicted by Larry Gates, and asked him for information he could provide regarding the incident.

In the movie: During the highly acclaimed slap scene, Tibs visited the residence of plantation owner Endicott, depicted by Larry Gates, and asked him for information he could provide regarding the incident.

He remembered telling the actor that it was a complete reaction and would have to be done fast. When I return to Philadelphia, I won’t accept it. “

The late performer is reportedly enthusiastic about the scene and said, “Don’t worry, the scene will work and be powerful.”

The retired director also talked about the impact of the scene on former South African President Nelson Mandela. Nelson Mandela reportedly became interested in this feature after the slap was censored in his country.

Juison said politicians found the scene and were interested in it. “He felt that this would never happen in South African films.”

Direction: Recall that Juison told the actor that it was a complete reaction and would have to be done fast. When I return to Philadelphia, I won't accept it.

Direction: Recall that Juison told the actor that it was a complete reaction and would have to be done fast. When I return to Philadelphia, I won’t accept it. “He will be seen in 2017

The director pointed out that the scene has become a big influence on the viewers of the movie, regardless of their country of origin.

“And I don’t know if Sydney knew it, but anyway, I think it was when someone said it was like a slap that echoed around the world,” he said. rice field.

He added: “And I think it’s a moment in the movie that people remember.”

Grant continued to appreciate the late actor, noting that his contribution to the film world was extensive.

Affect: The director pointed out that the scene has become very influential to movie viewers regardless of country of origin.

Affect: The director pointed out that the scene has become very influential to movie viewers regardless of country of origin.

“He had the morality to go to all his films, and if you see a fellow black actor who praised him, it was the first and because he broke the white bar first.” She said.

“Sydney was just a hero … he was the first black hero in the movie world,” she said.

The actress then mourned the loss of her former co-star and said he was the guiding light of many American performers.

“Since Sydney was so respected, I lost a friend and America lost a symbol in a way,” she said.

Very influential: Grant continued to appreciate the late actor and noted that his contribution to the film world was extensive.

Very influential: Grant continued to appreciate the late actor and noted that his contribution to the film world was extensive.

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Norman Jewison and Lee Grant say Sidney Poitier’s famous slap scene “sounded all over the world.”

Source link Norman Jewison and Lee Grant say Sidney Poitier’s famous slap scene “sounded all over the world.”

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