World

“No one will talk about it”: The murder of a film producer in a small Irish town remains a mystery | Ent & Arts News

The brutal murder of a French film producer over 20 years ago has hurt the small town of Sur on the southwest coast of Ireland.

According to Oscar-nominated filmmaker Jim Sheridan, locals who have spent years investigating the case are still reluctant to speak publicly about the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier. ..

“That’s why I was interested in it, the fact that no one talks about it,” the veteran director told Sky News.

“That’s all people talk about, but it wasn’t in the record.

“It was a scar on Sur and West Cork.”

Sophie was found dead in December 1996 after being beaten outside a villa near Sur, Cork, two days before Christmas.

The 39-year-old woman married the famous French filmmaker Daniel Toscandu Plantier. The movie included a 1989 hit cock, thief, wife, and lover.

image:
Sophie was found dead outside her home in Cork

British journalist Ian Bayley, the main suspect in the murder, who lived a few miles away and was the first reporter on the scene, was first asked about his death in February 1997.

Forensic evidence has never linked him to the scene, and he has never been charged with murder by Irish police.

But he Convicted of murder in his absence In 2019, a French court sentenced him to 25 years in prison.

Succeeded in fighting repeated demands for surrender from French authorities-the latest Dismissed by the Irish High Court in October -Bailey still lives in West Cork and maintains his innocence.

Ian Bailey, outside of Dublin's High Court, refused his attempt to hand over by French authorities in 2020.
image:
Ian Bailey, outside of Dublin’s High Court, refuses the delivery request

Now, a new sky documentary, Murder At The Cottage: The Search For Justice For Sophie, revisits the killings and interviews new footage and some of the key figures in the case, including Bailey. Is featured.

The five-part series was produced, directed and announced by Sheridan. Sheridan’s predecessors include the hit films “My Left Foot” and “In the Name of the Father” starring Daniel Day-Lewis.

Sheridan said during the production of the documentary that only locals in the tax collector, Sur, agreed to talk to him on the camera.

The rest of the people he interviewed in the area were the local term “brow-in” for people staying there from outside the town.

“The woman who found the body was in English and her husband was in English,” Sheridan said.

“Most of the people who had something to say were blown away.

“I ended up talking to a minister who was mentally connected to Sophie. He shed tears and talked to me.

“That’s the only way you can try to connect with her spirit other than talking to your family.”

Film director Jim Sheridan.Photo: Sky Studio
image:
Filmmaker Jim Sheridan investigated the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier.Photo: Sky Studio

By talking to her family, Sheridan said, “I got to know Sophie and her career,” and it became clear that “many of them were mysterious.”

“Sure, her relationship with her husband was full of difficulties and no one actually touched it,” he said.

Sophie’s husband, Daniel, who died in 2003, was in France when she was killed.

Sheridan said she had interviewed Sophie’s son Pierre Louis Bodi Vinault, who was “100% confident” that Bailey was responsible for the murder at the age of 15 when his mother died.

Film producer Daniel Toscan du Plantier (L) attends the funeral of his wife Sophie with his son Pierre Louis in 1996 near Toulouse.
image:
Film producer Daniel Toscandu Plantier (L) attends the funeral of his wife Sophie with his son Pierre Louis in 1996.

However, Irish filmmakers believe that no one was tried for Sophie’s murder because police “focused only on Ian Bailey,” and other individuals could be behind the murder. There is sex.

“I think most of the people involved were trying to find the truth with all their heart and soul, but they made a quick decision,” he says.

Sheridan believes Bailey should be tried in Ireland or the murder investigation should be “restarted.”

“They can say it’s an ongoing investigation, but it’s not as advanced as I’ve noticed anything in progress about it,” he said.

“There isn’t much police activity around it.

“Of course, the clues I came across should have been given to the police, and I have an obligation not to reveal them (publicly) because they interfere with the investigation of the murder case.”

Ian Bailey speaks to reporters at his home in Cork on February 13, 1997.
image:
Ian Bailey speaks to reporters at his home in Cork in February 1997

Sheridan said the question of whether Bailey should be handed over to France was a “troublesome question” because it “revealed weaknesses within Europe’s structure regarding cross-border cooperation.”

“If the French police allowed the Irish police to investigate in France, I would say he should be handed over,” he added.

“But if French police keep Irish police out of the investigation, how can they be handed over?

“The European Community needs to work in both directions. This is a fundamental issue.”

Cottage Murder: Sky’s original documentary, Sophie’s Quest for Justice, airs today and all episodes are available on Sky Climb and NOW TV.

“No one will talk about it”: The murder of a film producer in a small Irish town remains a mystery | Ent & Arts News

Source link “No one will talk about it”: The murder of a film producer in a small Irish town remains a mystery | Ent & Arts News

Back to top button