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Nature: Bumblebees travel using human-created paths and lanes.

Bumblebee Navigating the surroundings using human-created paths and lanes revealed new research.

Researcher derived from Queen University of Mary London The transplanted bee hive was transplanted to a landscape, a rice farm, featuring only a grid of raised paths.

Radar tracking of insects showed that bees initially relied on trails to help them find their way — at least until they became more confident.

According to the team, a better understanding of how bumblebees move can help in efforts to protect important insects that are declining in population.

Various bee seeds Use of pesticides, Loss of natural habitat, malnutrition, climate change, illness.

This study is part of a broader project that uses bees as a model to design small flying robots and investigate whether they can help move as well.

A new study shows that bumblebees use human-created paths and lanes to move around.Photo: Bumblebee in flight

The study was conducted by Joanna Brebner, an ethologist at Queen Mary University of London, and her colleagues.

“I think these paths and roads are essentially used by bees as visual crutches,” Brebner said. Times..

“They make life easier, that is, if they are not sure, they will obey them, but they can ignore them — they don’t have to obey them,” she said. explained.

In their study, the team equipped 83 bees from eight hives with a special lightweight metal transponder that allowed them to track their flight using harmonic radar.

Each transponder weighs only a few milligrams, which is known to be sufficient for the maximum load of nectar and pollen worker bees.

Urticaria was taken to a rice farm in Spain, just south of Seville. The farm consisted of a grid of unflooded paddy fields, each covering an area of ​​1378×656 feet (420x200m), separated by a pair of raised paths and one-lane roads.

In addition to these trails, the farm was inherently flat and had no other ground features normally used to help bees navigate.

In each radar tracking session, two hives were used simultaneously and installed near four feeding stations containing unscented sucrose solutions for bees.

Three feeders were placed along the paths and lanes adjacent to the individual paddy fields, and a fourth was placed in the center of one of the fields.

Urticaria was taken to a rice farm in Spain (pictured) just south of Seville. The farm consisted of a grid of unflooded paddy fields, each covering an area of ​​1378x656 feet (420x200m), separated by a pair of raised paths and one-lane roads.

Urticaria was taken to a rice farm in Spain (pictured) just south of Seville. The farm consisted of a grid of unflooded paddy fields, each covering an area of ​​1378×656 feet (420x200m), separated by a pair of raised paths and one-lane roads.

In each radar tracking session, two hives were used simultaneously and installed near four feeding stations containing unscented sucrose solutions for bees. Three feeders were placed along the paths and lanes adjacent to the individual paddy fields, and a fourth was placed in the center of one of the fields.Photo: Map of experimental layout

In each radar tracking session, two hives were used simultaneously and installed near four feeding stations containing unscented sucrose solutions for bees. Three feeders were placed along the paths and lanes adjacent to the individual paddy fields, and a fourth was placed in the center of one of the fields.Photo: Map of experimental layout

The team found that when bees first began exploring new environments, they consistently followed roads and paths. Even if you took a more direct route to your destination, it would have been faster.

“Honeybee exploration flights, exploration behaviors, and foraging routes are shaped by linear features, and bees often fly parallel along paths and roads,” the researchers write in a treatise.

However, the reliance on human-made functions was temporary. Bees began to use more direct shortcuts to feeders as they got used to the new environment.

When researchers tried to get rid of the feeding station, the bees found that they were using the road to look for the missing feeder. For example, if the feeder in question was previously on a trail, look along the trail.

In contrast, if the missing feeder is located in the middle of the field, the bees will use the path as the boundary to look for.

The team found that when the bees first began exploring the new environment, they consistently followed roads and paths (upper left, upper right, lower left). However, the reliance on human-made functions was temporary. Bees began to use more direct shortcuts to feeders as they got used to the new environment (bottom right).

The team found that when the bees first began exploring the new environment, they consistently followed roads and paths (upper left, upper right, lower left). However, the reliance on human-made functions was temporary. Bees began to use more direct shortcuts to feeders as they got used to the new environment (bottom right).

Understanding how bees migrate helps to plant bee-dependent crops for pollination in a way that ultimately improves yields, so-called benefits that often benefit plants that grow on the edge of the field. Avoid the “edge effect”.

“What you can do about it is to design the field differently or place the birdhouses elsewhere,” Ms. Brebner told The Times.

In addition to this, conservationists can work to prevent bees from nesting where trails and paths can cause problems.

Brebner added that the findings “predict what bees might do and provide a range to take advantage of this.”

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Animal behavior..

Decrease in bee population

Decreased bee numbers and health in recent months have raised global concerns due to the important role of insects as major pollen maters.

Bee health has been carefully monitored in recent years as honeybees have fewer sources of nutrients available and increased pesticide contamination.

In animal model studies, researchers found that a combination of pesticide exposure and malnutrition reduced bee health.

Bees use sugar to fuel their flights and work in their nests, while pesticides reduce sugar levels in the blood lymph (“bee blood”), thus reducing energy storage.

When pesticides are combined with limited food, bees lack the energy to function and their survival rates plummet.

Nature: Bumblebees travel using human-created paths and lanes.

Source link Nature: Bumblebees travel using human-created paths and lanes.

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