Entertainment

My daughter’s fight for anorexia nervosa has been devastated by social media

When her daughter Dolly scrolls her cell phone, she reflects off David Baddiel. You need to be careful. “

first time, David Discussing Dolly’s Battle AnorexiaIncluding how he couldn’t protect his little girl from a potentially damaging fall Instagram Rabbit burrow.

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Until now, Dolly’s illness remained a “private family problem.”Credit: Getty
For many young people, David thinks his identity is better than anyone, even if it results from something harmful like anorexia nervosa.

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For many young people, David thinks his identity is better than anyone, even if it results from something harmful like anorexia nervosa.Credit: BBC

He tells her: It turns out that it is causing you pain. “

Until now, Dolly’s illness has remained a “private family problem.”

But now, the 20-year-old has chosen to talk about how being part of a “competitive” online eating disorder community affected her rehabilitation.

tonight BBC2 Documentary David Baddiel: Social Media, Anger And Us, Dolly said: I think social media has made recovery much more difficult. “

Dolly says many teenagers are trying to develop their identities online, and social media didn’t directly cause her eating disorders, but she believes it exacerbated the problem.

She says being anorexia nervosa gave her a sense of identity reflected online.

In another interview, Dolly said: .. “

For many young people, any identity is better than anyone, even if it results from harmful things like anorexia nervosa, hits 57-year-old David.

David was unaware of Dolly’s Instagram scrolling range at the time, as the nature of her illness kept her so secret.

He says: “Dolly would definitely have been better without it.”

Comedians are open books on most topics, but I’ve been careful to keep my daughter’s experience private.

He states: “This was Dolly, not mine. It was so dangerous while it was happening,” I can’t get in the way of this in a way that would be counterproductive to her getting better. “I thought.

Dolly, who describes herself as “obsessive-compulsive disorder,” suffered from anxiety before her eating disorder.

She describes the program as follows:

“But once I got inside, I think social media made it much harder for me to recover.”

Most of the most famous accounts that encouraged social media users to lose weight to each other are closed by regulators, but joining a similar account can make them more competitive, Dolly said. say.

She now realizes that posting photos taken before and after hospital treatment isn’t about getting better, it’s about telling a fake story to match what you see online.

It was a fascinating identity because I didn’t really like who I was.I think it’s pretty common among teenagers

Dolly Love Day

She states: “Anorexia nervosa and eating disorders are generally highly competitive illnesses.

Once I found this recovery community on Instagram, it was easy to understand the identity of anorexia nervosa.

“It was a fascinating identity because I didn’t really like who I was. I think it’s very common among teenagers.”

Confessed Twitter addict David has sent over 65,000 tweets since joining the platform in 2009, scrolling up to 5 hours a day, despite the negative opinions he sometimes encounters. I admit that I did.

He states: “I’m awake, reaching for my cell phone and looking at emails, but I’m also looking at Twitter. The addiction that puts you at risk of extreme hatred is that you’re addicted. It’s a strange thing to feel. “

He partially uses social media to promote books, tours and television shows. And as an entertainer, David also knows that it provides an instant, always-accessible audience.

The comedian turned to a broadcaster, and the two fathers, the writer, said:

“You get a nice post on Twitter, and it’s like laughing.”

He has a lot of enthusiastic fans on the platform, but he also experienced hatred.

And David is well aware of the power of social media. He states: “We are all tweeting away from absolute cancellation and destruction.”

For the documentary, David wanted to investigate why social media was so angry. He states: “It seems to fuel a culture of anger and anger.

We are all one tweet away from absolute cancellation and destruction

David Badiel

“It’s both terrible and wonderful.”

As part of the investigation, David underwent a brain scan at University College London, where he was flooded with tweets posted about him.

Some were free, but others included anti-Semitic abuse and named him “hypocrites” or “s *** humans.”

Scan results showed that positive tweets stimulated the brain’s reward center. This is what David calls his “pleasure fix”.

In contrast, horribly, negative tweets prompted a “fight or flight” reaction in the brain.

During the experiment, he was completely stationary, but David’s brain showed that he was ready to move his hand.

David said: “The brain recognizes negative tweets as a threat.

“I want to fight, but you can’t fight, so divert it to something else.”

He meets Professor Matthew Williams, director of Hate Lab at Cardiff University, who monitors aggressive behavior online.

Professor Williams said his research on London showed that the increase in anger on Twitter was reflected in the actual hatred on the streets a week later.

David also met former builder-turned TikTok star Nick Smith, whose comedy video has 2.5 million followers on The Smithy Family.

Nick was targeted by an arsonist at his home in Welling, southeast London this summer, where his family’s car was burned.

When David meets his family, a charred baby child seat is on the driveway, and the semi-detached house turns black from where the flames were licked around the window where the two young daughters were sleeping.

Fortunately, everyone escaped unharmed.

When people are angry, they don’t want to apologize, they want to stay angry

David Badiel

Nick is distraught and full of guilt that has tossed his loved ones with online trolls. He claims that: That was my fault. “

Comedian Phil Wang also reveals that an online user told him:

That ominous warning came after he made a controversial joke about former Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn on BBC 1’s “I have news for you.”

Phil said: “Even if you don’t do that, some of the damage is already done with the threat.”

David reveals that he was also a victim of trolling.

In the late 90’s, Frank Skinner and David “blacked up” to impersonate soccer player Jason Lee while hosting the comedy footy show’s Fantasy Football League.

He has since apologized, but when he discusses anti-Semitic topics, the case is used by Twitter critics to undermine David’s credibility.

He states: “I’m very happy to be able to continue to apologize for it because it was wrong and racist.”

But on Twitter, he said:

David decides to see how leaving social media for two weeks could affect him.

Prior to sending sign-off tweets to 787,000 followers, he received a happiness assessment with Dr. Emma Short, a psychologist specializing in online behavior. Then he says: “I’m already worried.”

However, after making another assessment at the end of the experiment, David found that he had better sleep, better concentration, and overall happiness.

He states:

David can’t resist signing in to Twitter again. On Twitter, his return will soon be welcomed by some and despised by others.

“One of the things I don’t think I have to say on the deathbed is,’I want to tweet a little more.'”

Nevertheless, David can’t resist signing in to Twitter again. There, his return is immediately welcomed by some and despised by others.

“I’m afraid to be excluded from the conversation,” he admits.

He knows there is so much anger and anger on the platform, but David also recognizes that it’s a good thing to do.

In a cry, he also longs to hear from a “quiet” voice.

So, on October 4, when his father, Colin, who discussed a trip with David with dementia in a Channel 4 documentary, was rushed to the hospital, David told Twitter:

He admits that he wrote the message, partly because he somehow wanted it to happen through the mere process of posting the message.

Then, reading the message of love and sympathy, David says: “It’s also because I hear from quiet people.”

David Baddiel: Social media, anger, and we’re on BBC 2 tonight at 9pm.

David is familiar with the power of social media

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David is familiar with the power of social mediaCredit: BBC
David also meets Nick Smith, a TikTok star who turned into a former builder. Nick Smith's comedy video has 2.5 million followers on

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David also meets Nick Smith, a TikTok star who turned into a former builder. Nick Smith’s comedy video has 2.5 million followers on “The Smithy Family.”Credit: BBC
We also see comedian Phil Wang revealing what online users have told him.

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We also see comedian Phil Wang revealing what online users have told him.Credits: Handouts

The sun says

Anyone who suspects the harmful effects of social media should read Dolly Badiel’s tragic story.

Dolly, the daughter of David, a comedian of the Three Lions, fought anorexia. It was exacerbated by the sneaky “gluttony” Instagram account.

Newspapers and television stations that are highly regulated in this country will be closed to publish such materials.

Still, Facebook — Instagram owners — escapes all the consequences and only increases profits by tens of millions of dollars.

Why do you allow it?

Badiel and Skinner made fun of “It’s Coming Home (Again)” at the World Cup if England defeated Italy in the Euro 2020 final

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My daughter’s fight for anorexia nervosa has been devastated by social media

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