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Microsoft promises to recognize Activision Blizzard unions

Microsoft and American Communications Workers (CWA) have reached a neutrality agreement that promises to pave the way to unification for the team at Activision Blizzard, Microsoft’s $ 68.7 billion game studio.

Quality assurance team at Activision Blizzard Raven Software subsidiary voted to unite last month, the culmination of months of action – including a five – week strike in January over Activision’s decision to dismiss 12 QA testers – which led to the first union by a major US video game publisher. Despite initially refusing to recognize the CWA – backed union, Bobby Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard, said. reported he changed taxi in an email to the team last week.

Microsoft announced its intention to buy Activision Blizzardresponsible for games such as Call of Duty and World of Warcraft, in January, raised the prospect of a formal employee union operating within Microsoft.

While Microsoft previously indicated that it would not be a barrier to activists’ unions at Activison Blizzard, the a five-point agreement announced by the CWA and Microsoft on its formal Monday position.

The agreement promises a “neutral approach” to the trade unionization of employees without interference from Microsoft, and guarantees that employees can communicate freely with trade union colleagues and labor organizers. The agreement will take effect 60 days after the proposed acquisition closes, the CWA said.

The neutrality agreement will allow Activision workers to “exercise their democratic rights in organizing and collective bargaining,” CWA President Chris Shelton said in a statement. “Microsoft’s binding commitments will give employees a seat at the table and ensure that the acquisition of Activision Blizzard will benefit the company’s employees and the wider video game labor market,” he said.

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Microsoft promises to recognize Activision Blizzard unions

Source link Microsoft promises to recognize Activision Blizzard unions

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