Entertainment

Matt Edmondson reveals that he and his wife, Bryony, are expecting a second child together.

Matt Edmondson revealed that he and his wife, Bryony, are expecting a second child.

Presenter (35) said that the couple, who are already parents of daughter Ivy (5), are expecting another girl.

In an episode of Lorraine on Wednesday, a former Extra Factor presenter said the baby’s arrival was “really imminent.”

Excitement: Matt Edmondson reveals that he and his wife, Bryony, are expecting a second child.

He said: Ivy came three and a half weeks early when I was trying to shoot an extra factor, so I think this will come on Christmas day.

“But that can happen at any time for now. It’s a girl! Christmas Holly and Ivy would be great … but we’re still in talks about the name.

“I’ve confused the list of children’s names with dog names, but now I can’t remember what’s for kids and what’s for dogs.

“We already have a dog, but we should always have a list of potential names just in case.”

Family: Presenter, 35, said a couple, already parents of daughter Ivy, 5, expects another girl.

Family: Presenter, 35, said a couple, already parents of daughter Ivy, 5, expects another girl.

Matt presents the show on BBC Radio 1 with former Saturday singer Mollie King, who he speaks on the phone every day.

He said:’She is my best friend in the world. We have 5 hours on the train together. I am looking forward to it.

“We talk on the phone every day. It’s like a brotherhood and it’s great.”

After Matt revealed in a shared Instagram post last month that a diagnosis of cyclothymia was “life-changing” when he opened about a rare disorder.

Radio 1 star, who first revealed his condition in January, elaborated on how he felt after finally getting the name of his long-standing struggles suffering from extremely different moods. He told the fans: .. “

Interview: In an episode of Lorraine on Wednesday, a former Extra Factor presenter said the baby's arrival was

Interview: In an episode of Lorraine on Wednesday, a former Extra Factor presenter said the baby’s arrival was “really imminent.”

Cyclothymia causes mood swings that make people feel very low or emotionally high, “the condition is similar to that of bipolar disorder. Lesser-known conditions can lead to bipolar disorder if left untreated.

According to the NHS, cyclothymia, or cyclothymia, causes mild symptoms that do not require mental health treatment. In many cases, emotional highs are “feeling good”, so patients “do not notice something is wrong or want to ask for help.”

As a result, cyclothymia is often not diagnosed or treated.

In a frank message, Matt explains that bouts of euphoria comparable to his extreme depression have become difficult for people in his life, and his final diagnosis is that he himself went up. It helped control his condition because he could “intercept” things when he felt he was or down. “

Matt tells his followers:

He said: Ivy came three and a half weeks early when I was trying to shoot an extra factor, so I think this will come on Christmas day. “

“If I could find myself starting to be’up’or’down’, it helped me understand that I could do something to intercept it. “

Matt went on to explain that whenever there was an overwhelming urge to embark on a project, he was forced to “do not do it” and waited a few days to give him some control over his condition. Did.

He also had his work routine “ground” him before detailing how the blockade of the coronavirus ultimately led him to seek medical help in his contrasting mood. He admitted that he remained worried about his mental health.

He writes:

Frank: After a shared Instagram post last month revealed that what was diagnosed was

Frank: After a shared Instagram post last month revealed that what was diagnosed was “life-changing” when Matt opened for a rare disability.

Finally: Matt told his followers:

Finally: Matt told his followers:

Help: He also had his work routine

Reveal everything: Radio Star elaborated on how disability affected his life

Help: He also had his work routine “grounded” him before detailing how the blockade of the coronavirus ultimately led him to seek medical help in his contrasting mood. I admitted that I was worried about his mental health

“For my mental health, I think having a” project “to work on is at the root of me. I haven’t talked much about it before, but a few years ago I was diagnosed with a condition called cyclothymia.

He continued:’For a long time I was in one of those two moods. The “up” time feels really great. They have a relentless energy, a sense of excitement, and a thirst for new ideas.

“I don’t sleep much, I don’t eat when I need it, and I often do a huge amount of work in a very short time and ignore everything else around me.”

The television personality explained how his fierce “low” period led him to seek medical help, Matt added: panic. ‘

At the beginning: The television personality explained how his fierce

At the beginning: The television personality explained how his fierce “low” period led him to seek medical help, Matt added:

Share everything:

Share everything: “I don’t sleep much, I don’t eat when I need it, and I do a huge amount of work in a very short time and often ignore everything else around me (Take a picture with radio co-star Mollie King’

Savior: In a long post, Matt revealed that he's been working on new music for the past year and announced a new podcast titled

Well done: Matt talks about how his project took place over the course of a year, and in his first song, Hay Fever, featuring the vocals of The X Factor winner James Arthur, he

Savior: In a long post, Matt revealed that he’s been working on new music for the past year and announced a new podcast titled “Not Another Love Song.” The star admits that working on music “saved” him.

Matt first revealed in January that he was suffering from a rare cyclothymia and told the sun at the time:

“I have these extreme episodes that feel really productive and positive, and then there are periods when I feel low and unmotivated-thankfully, this is rare.

“I’m on top of that now, but I was a little confused when I was young. I was diagnosed in my late twenties.”

The NHS website adds the following conditions: ‘Mood swings can affect daily life and cause problems in personal and work relationships. If you suspect that you have cyclothymia, it is important to seek help from your GP.

“People with cyclothymia are at risk of developing bipolar disorder, so it is important to get help before reaching this stage. Men and women of all ages develop cyclothymia. It may be, but it is common in women.

Cyclothymia

Symptoms of cyclothymia

If you have cyclothymia, you don’t need much sleep, and when you feel a lot of energy, you feel depressed, followed by extreme well-being and excitement (called hypomania). The period of depression does not last long enough and is not severe enough to be diagnosed with clinical depression. During these periods, you may become insensitive and lose interest in things, but this should not stop you from continuing your daily life. Mood irregularities occur fairly often – never go for more than two months without experiencing depression or emotional uplift. The symptoms of cyclothymia are not severe enough to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and mood swings are disintegrated by the duration of normal mood.

Treatment of cyclothymia

Treatment usually includes medication and some type of conversational therapy (psychotherapy).

The purpose is to:

• Stop the development of cyclothymia into bipolar disorder

• Relieve symptoms

• Prevent symptoms from recurring

You will probably need to continue this treatment for the rest of your life.

medicine

You may be prescribed:

• Mood leveling drugs (mood stabilizers)

• Antidepressant

The mood stabilizers are:

• Lithium – commonly used to treat bipolar disorder

• Antiepileptic drugs – carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, sodium valproate, etc.

Antidepressants may help improve mood depression, but they can cause switching to other extreme conditions of hypomania.

Recently, several antipsychotics such as quetiapine have also been used as mood stabilizers.

However, not all people with cyclothymia respond to the drug.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), helps with cyclothymia. CBT involves talking to a trained therapist and finding ways to help manage symptoms by changing your mindset and behavior. You are given practical ways to improve your state of mind on a daily basis.

Source: https: //www.nhs.uk/conditions/cyclothymia/

Matt Edmondson reveals that he and his wife, Bryony, are expecting a second child together.

Source link Matt Edmondson reveals that he and his wife, Bryony, are expecting a second child together.

Back to top button