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Manor house? It’s a madhouse!Patrick Marmion reviews manners

Manners (National Theater, London).

Verdict: Bonker

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NS Christmas Carol (Old Vic, London)

Verdict: A snack regardless of the season

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4 Quartets (Harold Pinter Theater)

Verdict: A glimpse of eternity

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Finally, the National Theater came up with a play that only the work of super-right-wing delusional conspirators and soil-worshiping nuts could understand.

Everyone else will be confused and embarrassed, but on the contrary, it shows that the national flagship theater is really reaching out to all sections of society.

Moira Buffini’s rambling, frankly, usually exquisite Nancy Carroll and Mercury’s Shaun Evans (ITV’s Endeavor and his recent BBC series Vigil) set up a new play enough. Seems simple.

Diana (Carroll) lives in a collapsed mansion struck by a biblical storm believed to have been caused by climate change.

In search of shelter, a coincidental cross-section of modern British society appears at her doorstep.

The first to arrive is an ancient gay minister (David Hargreaves), followed by a black London nurse (Michele Austin) and her daughter of Bolsheviki (Shaniqua Okwok).

They are joined by ALBION leader Ted Farrier (Evans). This is a fictitious group of white supremacists who are British nationalists.

The setup of the new play, usually starring Moira Buffini's rambling, frankly, usually exquisite Nancy Carroll and Mercurial Shaun Evans (pictured), seems simple enough.

The setup of the new play, usually starring Moira Buffini’s rambling, frankly, usually exquisite Nancy Carroll and Mercurial Shaun Evans (pictured), seems simple enough.

Even in the house, things are pretty stormy. After the discussion, the launched rock star Diana’s husband (Owen McDonnell) fell downstairs while at a high place in the magic mushroom.

His daughter Isis (Ria Dandan Lee) doesn’t really bother me. She seems to want to clarify that she is named after the Egyptian goddess, not the Islamic State group.

Also, for a voluntary house party from hell, a former Sainsbury checkout assistant (Edward Judge) who is overweight, who falls under Ted’s spell, and Ted’s driver, who was hired by ALBION’s cause while in prison. There is (Peter Bray).

Finally, there is Ted’s blind academic girlfriend (Amy Forest), an expert in the history of the French Revolution.

I think Diana’s Manor House is a sign that Britain has collapsed. But in reality, it’s just an excuse for men to spit out the tampering of sub-Nietzsche supremacists.

Inevitably, there are complaints about the acquisition of Islam. Nurses darkly warn them that they are “cling to the law of the future.” What do you mean? who knows.

Baffini is doing well with a minister who has a nice line of Whitney Houston-style politeness: “It’s hard to maintain love until you love yourself.”

But since everyone has oars, there are just too many random characters armed with too many crackpot ideas.

Carol’s whimsical Diana becomes fascinated by the “charismatic man” as she is repelled by Ted.

Evans Ted, hovering from a sprained ankle, is a rattle scouse fascinated by Reese. He may be vaguely charismatic, but he won’t tear your clothes in any way — more “call the cop now!” In some way (but fair to Diana). Her phone line is down to make sure).

Not surprisingly, Fiona Buffini’s work cannot understand the misfortune of her sister Madcap, which is neither dramatically serious nor obviously interesting.

Les Brotherston’s wacky set is as hard to see as the plot follows. And John Nichols’ slasher film score encourages us to think of all this in terms of apocalyptic fate.

At least I was impressed that Sister Buffini managed to steer this turmoil through the national literary department.

I have long suspected that the place was invaded by a rebel, a right-wing fifth-rowist. Now, perhaps, we have evidence.

Another Christmas carol in November? foolish!

The first Mark Gatiss Nottingham work (reopened at Alexandra Palace this week). And now, Stephen Manganese is the repeat of Old Vic’s fifth show in five years.

As the old Scrooge says, the theater remains dark and it would be better to “reduce the surplus population” of Christmas carols.

Obviously not! The production of Jack Thorne’s adaptation by Matthew Warchus is the benchmark for modern Christmas carols on stage.

Stephen Manganese attends the show as sage and onions stuff the festive birds. His

Stephen Manganese attends the show as sage and onions stuff the festive birds. His “choice” in his penny and life, even if he looks like a metrosexual Beardyman as you would expect to find him promoting a rare breed of Waitrose turkey than a stingy Ruin.

And manganese joins the show as sage and onions stuff into festive birds. Even if he looks like a metrosexual sissy that you would expect to find promoting a rare breed of Waitrose turkey than a stingy, his “choice” in his penny and life Ruin.

Anyway, the real star of Warchus’ production is the atmosphere created by the Milky Way of Lanterns on Rob Howell’s catwalk stage. Here, most landscapes are provided by squeaky sound effects, as Evenizer is given a tour of his life by Christmas ghosts of the past, present and future.

Christopher Nightingale’s captivating music jigs the cast, singing Carol’s snatches as the scene changes, and weaving O Holy Night’s inspirational variations. And finally, when the company’s crystal handheld bell rings, the audience yells and becomes “oh” and “ah” with damp eyes.

On top of that, a snow machine that fills the theater with swirling white flakes, and a charity FoodCycle whip round, and dare to say … it’s the upcoming Christmas carol.

Best of all, next month will be even more ripe.

The production of Jack Thorne's adaptation by Matthew Warchus is the benchmark for modern Christmas carols on stage.

The production of Jack Thorne’s adaptation by Matthew Warchus is the benchmark for modern Christmas carols on stage.

Fienne’s performance is a moving poem

Libby Perves

Simple and short performances can shake, offend or change you. So stay away from the mundane rush of earning and spending, leaving flashy Christmas streets and scrolling stubborn screens.

A tall, frowned man sits quietly for 75 minutes, looking back at time, eternity and death.

Feel “still the center of the spinning world” with him. Suddenly something huge fills you and runs away, a sharp wonder of the moment you can’t be caught.

TS Eliot wrote these four long poems in the 1930s and 1940s: they are not easy, but their music and images have great power.

Ralph Fiennes truly learned two long seals. He had previously recorded them, but wanted to get closer to Elliott’s religious and philosophical vision.

In this performance, he feels he managed to do so. Reaching out for the meaning of the eternal moment (although humans do not fully understand it).

They may come to a quiet rose garden by the crashing sea, with the children’s distant voice, or (as in Elliott’s case) watching the fire on the night of the blitzkrieg.

Ralph Fiennes truly learned two long seals. He had previously recorded them, but wanted to get closer to Elliott's religious and philosophical vision.

Ralph Fiennes truly learned two long seals. He had previously recorded them, but wanted to get closer to Elliott’s religious and philosophical vision.

When Fines learned poetry, he realized that the blockage seemed to squeeze or extend time, revealing our vulnerabilities and allowing four people to be physically played.

It was his genius. Because we are supported by his presence and his movements on stage. Sometimes dramatic and sometimes almost playful. It’s a simple set with a large rotating gray wall. Dark spaces open and close as he wanders between them, drifting from uplifting to despair, and sometimes even entertainment.

Elliott is sometimes lyrically beautiful and often learned, but he also suddenly stops thinking of his own embarrassment of not being able to express what he glimpsed.

Fines takes advantage of this and seems to be deep in meditation, sometimes alone, and sometimes appealing to us.

His touring this special show for months may have taken it even deeper. Worth drowning.

Manor house? It’s a madhouse!Patrick Marmion reviews manners

Source Manor house? It’s a madhouse!Patrick Marmion reviews manners

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