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“It doesn’t make sense”-immigrant charities say asylum seekers are trapped in a “dysfunctional” system | UK News

Immigrant charities have told Sky News about concerns about the implications of leaving asylum seekers trapped in a “dysfunctional” billing system while the application is being processed.

According to Care4Calais, government policies that are part of the asylum process for large accommodations such as hotels are also vulnerable to abuse by the far-right group.

The latest figures show that the Home Office is currently handling 109,000 asylum applications. This includes those who are waiting for the first decision. Those involved in the appeal process and those fighting deportation.

Multiple families may be involved in a single claim.

However, over the last decade, the number of asylum-seekers waiting for the first decision to apply for more than six months has increased tenfold.

Asylum-seekers are not allowed to work, but are given basic assistance, such as staying somewhere until a meal or decision is made.

However, the effects of delays have a more sinister side. Britain First, a far-right group, posted a video of a protest performed at accommodations for asylum seekers nationwide in August of this year.

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Britain First has posted a video of members confronting asylum seekers at their property.

Clare Moseley, founder of Care4Calais, said: Asylum seekers feel imprisoned, which is truly horrifying. It’s really easy for them (UK First) to use. They knocked on the hotel door and, in some cases, went inside and shouted to asylum seekers. That’s an unpleasant behavior. “

The Home Office will disperse immigrants nationwide and wait for the application to be decided. They can end up in a variety of accommodations, including shared homes, hotels, and reusable empty buildings.

Concerns have been raised about the use of Kent’s former barracks, which activists say are psychologically difficult for migrants to escape conflict and authoritarian regimes.

Asylum seekers provided footage of accommodation in the former military barracks
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Asylum seekers provided footage of accommodation in the former military barracks

“The way to solve the problem is to be able to process people’s claims and contribute to society,” said Moseley, who harassed himself and received emails to help immigrants. Asylum seekers have been accused of it .. It doesn’t make sense. The purpose is to find out who really needs asylum and see who gets it and who doesn’t. The system It’s not working. “

Sky News visited two different cities in northern England to talk to asylum seekers at Interior Ministry accommodation.

Outside the hotel, I met a 32-year-old Kurdish Iraqi Fushan Amin who paid a smuggler to take him to England on a small boat from France at the end of March this year.

Former journalist Hooshang Amin paid a smuggler and took him by boat from France to England.
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Former journalist Hooshang Amin paid a smuggler and took him by boat from France to England.

He speaks five languages, but former journalists say other non-English-speaking migrants get “lost” in the system and knock on the door for help.

“Most of them need help. They can’t speak English … that’s a big problem for refugees,” he said.

Near the hotel, I met a local man named Peter and two children. He told us that migrants should be sent back to their country of origin.

“When I see children walking around her in the park, I’m just thinking about their safety. I don’t know who they are and where they came from.”

He admits that there is no evidence of cheating by asylum seekers living near him, but he states, “that’s my opinion.”

In another city, we met an asylum seeker. He named him Berzad and said he was from Iran. He visited a friend who illegally crossed the waterway in a small boat nine months ago, but they were sent elsewhere by the Home Office.

Bazad arrived in England on a small boat after leaving Iran
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After leaving Iran, Berzad arrived in England by a small boat.

He told us: “I live in Runcorn. I’m alone so I visit my friends. I don’t have a family.”

Stepping into British soil is a moment of joy for many asylum seekers after risking crossing the strait.

However, many say they never dreamed that the asylum system would be so elicited and difficult to navigate.

The first Iranian asylum seekers I met after Sky News illegally crossed the strait with a friend are fighting for the right to stay in Britain almost two years after their arrival.

Fearing the safety of his family in his hometown, he is too afraid to reveal his name.

He has been moved to multiple accommodations in at least four different towns and cities and has been threatened with deportation.

Many immigrants arrive in the United Kingdom after crossing the English Channel by boat.
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Many immigrants arrive in the United Kingdom after crossing the English Channel by boat.

He told me he loves Britain as a country, but added, “I’m living a very bad life right now. I feel stressed and in jail.”

The place to house asylum seekers is the minefield.

However, the impact on the crucible of community relations and the asylum-seekers themselves is exacerbated by the long delays in the processing system.

Peter Walsh, an immigration researcher at the Oxford University Immigration Observatory, said the number of asylum claims unprocessed was higher than ever.

He states: “There are many factors, including an increase in the number of applications over the last five years, changes in administrative policies and controls, and the termination of a government-run plan to quickly track asylum claims.

Immigrants sometimes pay people to smugglers to help them reach the UK
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Immigrants sometimes pay people to smugglers to help them reach the UK

“We also know that home offices and case workers are also reducing their investment in the departments that handle these cases. Some say that the complexity of the cases is increasing.”

The Home Office has said that it takes the well-being of asylum-seekers and the communities in which they live very seriously, and that efforts to fuel resentment against asylum-seekers and create tensions in the communities are completely unacceptable.

A spokeswoman said: “We are working to rationalize the case and have already made great strides in prioritizing vulnerabilities, but we are determined to clear the backlog and speed up our decisions.

“Our new immigration program will renew the broken asylum system, so we can crack down on those who are abusing our system and better protect and support those who really need asylum. increase.”

“It doesn’t make sense”-immigrant charities say asylum seekers are trapped in a “dysfunctional” system | UK News

Source “It doesn’t make sense”-immigrant charities say asylum seekers are trapped in a “dysfunctional” system | UK News

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