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Hostile states pose a “real threat” to Britain’s security as lawmakers warn of reforms needed to prevent “the next big parliamentary scandal” | Political news

Enemy states pose a “real threat” to Britain’s security, and the “next major parliamentary scandal” will soon take place without significant reform, the inter-party commission has warned.

Partisan parliamentary groups (APPGs) could easily be used to “improperly enter – to influence hostile foreign actors,” according to evidence from the Commons Standards Committee.

The large increase in the number of informal stakeholders risks “improper impact և accessibility” because they are so difficult to control.

Commons spokeswoman Sir Lindsay Hoyle warned the committee of “very, very worrying” security implications with urgent evidence without urgent changes to APPGs.

The report’s warnings came after a woman who was “instrumental” in creating the Chinese APPG in Britain. Revealed by MI5 as a spy for the Chinese government.

What are APPGs?

The Partisan Parliamentary Groups (APPGs) are informal inter-party groups led by members of parliament և by their peers:.

They have no official status in the parliament; most of them are individuals, organizations and organizations outside the parliament.

Rules for Inviting People Outside Parliament to Participate in APPGs State lawmakers need to think carefully about “are there any possible concerns about specific invitees?”

The rules say that groups “should be transparent about their nature, membership and funding”, but the current main concern is that they should not be confused with elected committees.

Labor MP Barry Gardiner, now the former leader of the disbanded group, received a donation of more than ,000 500,000 from Christine Lee before the warning in January.

The commission concluded. “We are concerned that if left unchecked, the APPGs could present the next major parliamentary scandal, when commercial organizations actually buy into the influence and influence of parliamentarians and decision-makers.”

Community authorities should “provide more substantial support” to help lawmakers scrutinize the benefits offered by foreign governments, the committee said.

The financing should be more transparent, the deputies said, թիվը the number of APPGs should be reduced from the current 744, the deputies added.

They also advised the application of regulations to limit the number of group secretariats to “reduce the risk of improper access”.

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The MP spoke with the Chinese “agent” about politics

Labor MP Chris Bryant, chairman of the Standards Committee, says APPGs “should never be a means of selling influence or pursuing commercial interests in the corridors of power.”

“Today’s report is a wake-up call for all of us. “The evidence we have gathered is terrifying, pointing to the urgent need for action by the House of Representatives,” he said.

“The parliament has always been, will always be the target of hostile foreign states.

“But with better regulation and transparency around these informal groups, we can ensure that they continue to make a positive contribution to our democracy.”

Sir Lindsay said he had been concerned for “several years” about the security risks posed by some APPGs, including their indiscriminate involvement with government actors hostile to the interests of the United Kingdom.

“I was also concerned about the proliferation of such groups, the influence of lobbyists on them, the lack of transparency in their activities, and the lack of regulation,” he added.

“I was told that the proposals are currently being discussed. After all, it is up to the whole chamber to make final decisions on how to better regulate.”

Hostile states pose a “real threat” to Britain’s security as lawmakers warn of reforms needed to prevent “the next big parliamentary scandal” | Political news

Source Hostile states pose a “real threat” to Britain’s security as lawmakers warn of reforms needed to prevent “the next big parliamentary scandal” | Political news

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