United Kingdom

Homeopathic charities were hit by an ad ban after claiming that treatment could be used for depression

Homeopathic charities were banned from advertising after claiming that the treatment could be used for depression, diabetes and infertility.

  • ASA ruled that Homeopathy UK broke the code on deterring depression treatment
  • Watchdog said the website contains a link to an article about homeopathic treatment
  • Charities claimed that they “did not dismiss traditional medications or discourage patients from seeking essential treatment from medical professionals.”

Homeopathic charities are prohibited from seeing conditions that include: depressionDiabetes and infertility on its website, by Advertising Watchdog.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has determined that homeopathy in the United Kingdom has broken the CAP code. This requires marketers not to discourage the essential treatment of conditions that require medical supervision.

Watchdog provides an anecdotal explanation from a doctor detailing how homeopathic methods were applied to treat the condition in question on the Conditions Directory page, which he considered an ad on the Homeopathy UK website. Said it contains a clickable link to the article it contains.

A charity formerly known as the British Homeopathy Society “did not dismiss traditional medications or discourage patients from seeking essential treatments from medical professionals,” the ASA said. Said in the judgment.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has determined that homeopathy in the United Kingdom has broken the CAP code. This requires marketers not to discourage the essential treatment of conditions that require medical supervision.

Homeopathy UK also aims that the article is beneficial and useful to the general public, including general medical practitioners, general medical council (GMC) registered physicians, and others who have used homeopathy in any medical practice they deem appropriate. He said it was written by a legally regulated medical professional.

The ASA said the content was written by a GMC-registered doctor, but said that “the ad and the articles it linked to refer to homeopathy in general, not treatment by a specific individual.”

“I understand that I don’t have the minimum professional qualifications needed to practice homeopathy. As a result, an unqualified practitioner advises, diagnoses, or treats consumers about the conditions described in the advertisement. May occur, “said the ASA decision.

The

The “Conditions Directory” page (updated photo), which Watchdog considered an ad on the Homeopathy UK website, details how homeopathy was applied to treat the condition in question. Said it contains a clickable link to an article with anecdotal explanations from

“Therefore, Homeopathy UK did not believe that all such treatments could be demonstrated to be under the supervision of a properly qualified medical professional.”

“Advertisements should not be displayed again in a dissatisfied manner,” the ASA added.

“We told Homeopathy UK to make sure that their future marketing communications did not mention the conditions under which appropriate qualified medical professionals should seek advice.”

What is the origin of homeopathy?

Homeopathy was first created in 1807 by the German physician Samuel Hahnemann and focuses on three principles.

Dr. Hahnemann believed that medicine in his time was more harmful than good, so he began experimenting with volunteers himself.

One such experiment involved eating the bark of a kina tree, which was used to treat malaria. Since then, scientists have discovered that the bark contains the antimalarial drug quinine.

After eating a portion of the bark, Hahnemann experienced symptoms that were likened to those of malaria, creating the first “cure-like” principle.

Doctors thought that if large amounts of substances cause certain symptoms, they can be used in small amounts to treat them.

According to the British Homeopathy Society, this treatment is used by more than 200 million people worldwide to treat both acute and chronic conditions.

However, according to a 2010 report by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee on homeopathy, homeopathic remedies are no better than placebo (dummy treatment).

In 2017, NHS England said it would not fund NHS homeopathy because the costs were not justified due to lack of evidence of NHS effectiveness. This was supported by a 2018 High Court ruling.

This is because they found that “there is no clear and solid evidence to support the use of homeopathy in the NHS.”

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Homeopathic charities were hit by an ad ban after claiming that treatment could be used for depression

SourceHomeopathic charities were hit by an ad ban after claiming that treatment could be used for depression

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