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EDF sent me a shock bill and set up collectors for me

I moved to a new home in August 2021 and was on an estimated fare with EDF, but moved to Octopus 37 days later.

I soon received the final bill from EDF, which was about £ 40, and paid it.

But in February 2022 I received another bill from EDF stating that I owed £ 879 in 37 days. The £ 40 I originally paid was refunded.

When I requested this, it turned out that EDF changed the last meter readings I gave, making the bill much bigger. In total, it added about 9,000 kWh.

Surprising bill: Our 21-year-old reader was sent a payment claim of £ 879 from EDF after he changed her last meter reading – but she doesn’t understand why (photo taken by the model)

I have no idea why she did it. The readings are so high that my counters still haven’t reached that figure six months after the readings were made.

I called and wrote EDF, and sent pictures of the meter readings that I took, but the problem was not resolved. My details were passed on to the debt collection agency and I received a threatening letter to the court.

I am only 21 years old, this is my first home and I feel that EDF does not take me seriously.

A debt collection agency might show up at my door at any moment, scary, and I know it could affect my credit rating. AQ, Surrey

Helen Crane of This is Money answers: I’m sorry to hear that. Electricity bills have already risen to tearful levels, so I can only imagine how shocked you were when you received a letter asking you to add hundreds more pounds.

EDF reviewing your final readings at thousands of kWh didn’t sound right, especially since you had photos to confirm it, so I tried to sort out your mystery counter.

You have an Economy 7 meter that gives two different readings: one for electricity used during the day at a higher price and the other for night electricity at a lower price.

Yours is also an old-fashioned analog counter that has dials representing the thousands, hundreds and tens that a customer has to add up to get kWh readings, instead of a counter that is easier to read, with a single digit.

Analog: The electricity meter has a number of dials that can be easily misread

Analog: The electricity meter has a number of dials that can be easily misread

Simple: these more conventional modern electricity meters are much easier to read

Simple: these more conventional modern electricity meters are much easier to read

It’s easy to see how someone can get confused, but you couldn’t – you managed to figure it out and send the correct day and night readings to both your old property provider, EDF, and your new one, Octopus, when you moved to

And yet you still got a bill of almost £ 900 for just over a month’s energy, which is more than 10 times the amount you expected to pay as one person in a small property.

Although you did the right thing and took pictures of your testimony, you were told that there were collectors in the case and that you could be sent to court to get your money back.

CRANE CRANE

Our weekly column sees that consumer expert “It’s Money” Helen Crane solves readers ’problems and covers companies that do both good and bad.

Do you want her to investigate the problem, or do you want to praise the firm for having gone the extra mile? Contact:

helen.crane@thisismoney.co.uk

When I was about your age, I had bailiffs at home after a neighbor got the right to pay the municipal tax, but I didn’t pay it or tell anyone – so I know how scary it can be. be for those just starting out.

I contacted EDF to ask him for an explanation.

The question, as it turned out, is that the former occupants of your home may not have been as skilled at displaying the counter as you are.

EDF said the meter had been incorrectly shown at some point in the past. It’s easy to see how this could have been done, as old-fashioned dials could hang between two digits, and the reader just chose the wrong one.

This meant that they provided readings that were much higher than the amount of energy they actually used.

From now on, regular energy companies base their bills on wildly incorrect information.

It seems that the former residents did not take meter readings, and the bills were based on estimates.

Error: EDF apologizes and erases £ 879 reader's note

Error: EDF apologizes and erases £ 879 reader’s note

Energy companies have also been banned from sending back bills for more than a year, which may have prevented this problem from appearing in the past.

Once you moved in and started submitting them, the numbers you gave seemed impossible because they were lower than those registered with energy firms many years ago.

Therefore, EDF considered your final readings to be false – so it based your accounts on estimates based on higher past readings, and as a result you received this score.

It says the testimonials he received when the previous owner signed up for EDF also look wrong in light of your new ones, so it could go on for years.

EDF recalculated your account, receiving a final figure of £ 79. As an apology for the stress he caused you, he also withdrew this fee, which means the bill is fully paid.

I’m glad it was resolved, just wish he couldn’t think right and investigate instead of going for a tough approach.

Rage vs. Machine: Shirley's new washing machine continued to break down, but AO.com quickly sent a replacement that worked much better

Rage vs. Machine: Shirley’s new washing machine continued to break down, but AO.com quickly sent a replacement that worked much better

Naughty and enjoyable list this week

Every week I look at companies that haven’t reached out to customer service, and those that have gone higher and further.

Strike: Reader Shirley was overwhelmed with praise for white goods retail, AO.com.

She expected to be squeezed out when her new washing machine kept breaking down, but the online store proved that customer service was top notch.

Shirley said: “I bought a Zanussi washing machine a little over a year ago at AO.com. It turned out to be a nightmare machine with so many problems.

“I happily tried to contact Zanussi, but contacted AO.com, and he gave me a brand new Hisense machine, installed and removed the old machine, and it’s a much better washing machine.

“I would recommend using AO.com for complete peace of mind, as after-sales service is not equal.”

I’m glad to hear that replacing the car was more of a quick spin than a long cycle.

Mail crash: Reader Joyce continues to receive payment claims from a collector who works for energy firm Bulb - despite never using the company

Mail crash: Reader Joyce continues to receive payment claims from a collector who works for energy firm Bulb – despite never using the company

month: Another reader is ready to blow up a fuse at an energy firm.

Joyce contacted to say that she is being sent payment claims by mail from a debt collection agency that works for the supplier Bulbwho is now in the administration – despite never being a client of the firm.

The letters were addressed to the rightful owner of her property with her correct address printed, so, like our first reader, she was worried that a collector would appear at her door.

She called the collection agency to try to sort out the matter, but says the man on the other end refused to talk to her if she did not pass on her personal information.

She also spoke to Bulb’s debt collection department, who said she would pass the message and stop the letters, but she still received them.

Joyce was going to go to the hospital for surgery and said that constant letters leave her stressed.

I contacted Bulb to ask him to disable these communications once and for all.

A Bulb spokesman said: “We are sorry that the debt collection agency, which works on our behalf, sent letters to Joyce’s house by mistake.

“We made sure all communications were cut off, and offered Joyce compensation to apologize.”

Joyce told me she didn’t want the money, just assured me she wouldn’t be contacted again.

She took the proposed £ 30 and donated them to the Ukrainian Appeals Commission.

I am glad that something good has come out of this saga.

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EDF sent me a shock bill and set up collectors for me

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