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Dr. Ellie Cannon: My wife’s snoring is terrible … Should I take pills and sleep?

My wife has always been a noisy sleeping pill, but she is currently taking the prescribed sleeping pills, snoring, moaning, and moaning louder and lasting longer. I can hardly sleep even in the spare room. Would you like to take sleeping pills?

Anyone who spends a few days without sleep will know that it can be painful. Large partner snoring was a common cause and I had to deal with countless times in the clinic.

The important thing is not to blame your partner for being out of control of what happens when you sleep.

Many noisy sleepers have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea, which causes them to stop and start breathing. This causes snoring, gasping, and very large snoring, which increases until crescendo is reached.

Today’s readers want to know if he should take sleeping pills to help him at night as he is awakened by his wife who snores loudly

People who are suffering are very disturbed in their sleep, often feel tired, and have poor concentration and headaches.

If the GP suspects sleep apnea, they will refer you to an expert to test it by monitoring your breathing and heart rate.

Details from Dr. Erie Cannon on The Mail on Sunday …

A sleep mask called CPAP, or a plastic device in the mouth, both help keep the trachea open. These seem pretty alarming, but their effects can be life-changing.

Hypnotics are not a long-term solution to serious sleep problems. In fact, it usually exacerbates apnea and snoring, as well as smoking, alcohol, and sleeping on the back.

The pill should be used only for rest from insomnia and within a week. Beyond this, it rarely improves sleep quality, but it is addictive. However, they can be a solution, especially for short periods of stress.

GPs help you weigh the risks and benefits. Also, taking sleeping pills does not guarantee that you will not hear your partner’s snoring.

A non-drug option is earplugs. The right pair can really make all the difference-see your pharmacist for advice.

For the past year, I have suffered from a hot and tingling sensation in my legs and legs (called sensory polyneuropathy). Are there any medicines I can take to stop it?

When doctors use the term neuropathy, it means that some nerves in the body are not functioning properly, usually causing abnormal sensations and pain due to injury or illness.

The term polyneuropathy means that multiple nerves are affected. So, for example, you may have strange sensations in both hands, not just one.

Do you have a question for DR ELLIE?

Send an email to DrEllie@mailonsunday.co.uk or send an email to Health, The Mail on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London, W85TT.

Dr. Ellie can only answer in the general context and cannot respond to individual cases or personal responses.

If you have any health concerns, be sure to consult your GP.

There are two main types of nerves. Motor nerves control our muscles and movements, and sensory nerves are involved in the senses we feel, such as temperature and touch.

Therefore, sensory polyneuropathy means that there is a problem with the nerves involved in the supply of sensation to or from the brain.

Symptoms include numbness, pins and needles, burning pain, and loss of balance and coordination. The drug is useful, but the type given depends on the underlying cause and symptoms of the problem.

There is a range of painkillers designed to treat nerve pain, such as amitriptyline, gabapentin, and pregabalin. However, if the sensations such as numbness and pins and needles are not painful, there are fewer options available.

Doctors investigate whether there is a root cause-many of them. This includes diabetes, B12 deficiency, alcohol overdose, drug side effects, viral infections such as shingles, and thyroid, kidney, and liver disease. Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus can also be a cause.

If the doctor cannot determine the root cause, it can be very difficult to treat the condition other than providing painkillers.

I am 74 years old and have been suffering from toe gout for the last 15 years. All treatments work, but come back every few months. Is there anything I can take to prevent it?

Gout is a type of arthritis that causes extreme pain in the joints, causing redness and swelling.

This happens when a substance called uric acid accumulates and forms small crystals that rub the joints. It tends to occur in one joint at a time and is usually very painful, red and warm to the touch for 24 hours.

Another reader is seeking advice on the treatment of their painful gout raised by the model

Another reader is seeking advice on the treatment of their painful gout raised by the model

Gout medications are intended for either treatment or prevention.

Treatment is aimed at controlling seizures such as painkillers such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and drugs called colchicine. They should be used with other interventions, such as an ice pack or resting with the affected area lifted.

If a patient has more than one seizure per year, the doctor will instead focus on preventive strategies. This includes a variety of medications that are initiated when the acute attack is over. However, preventive strategies can be difficult because drugs can cause a short-term surge in acute attacks.

Anti-inflammatory drugs can be given to help with this, but most people who choose prophylaxis take herbal medicines for life.

Reasons for not supporting MP’s free HRT call

Free prescriptions are available to a wide range of people, including women over the age of 60 and under 16 years, pregnant women and women who have just given birth, and people with a variety of illnesses such as cancer, diabetes and epilepsy.

Last week, MP called for menopausal women to be added to this list, or to receive a free HRT instead of paying a prescription fee of at least £ 9.35.

In a perfect world with infinite money, I think so, absolutely do this. But we are not in that world. For example, diabetics don’t pay for the drug because they get sick as soon as they don’t receive the drug, and the cost of the NHS is much higher when treated.

Last week, MP called for menopausal women to be added to this list, or to receive free HRT instead of paying a prescription of at least £ 9.35, which long-term ill patients do. There is a better way than spending money.Those who are not eligible for a free prescription

Last week, MP called for menopausal women to be added to this list, or to receive free HRT instead of paying a prescription of at least £ 9.35, which long-term ill patients do. There is a better way than spending money.Those who are not eligible for a free prescription

And there are many patients with long-term illnesses that are not covered by a free prescription, perhaps those with asthma, Parkinson’s disease, Crohn’s disease, colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases.

Giving them medicine will also save tens of millions of NHS in the long run, so this really needs to be seen by policy makers. Given that HRT is usually not taken for more than a few years, it is probably fair for patients to bear the financial burden, especially if the NHS resources are more thinly dispersed than ever before. Please let us know what you think.

Mask work, but not for all of us

I have received many responses to my comments urging the director of health to encourage patients to continue wearing masks at general practitioners and hospital clinics.

That makes sense to me, given the number of infections that occur each year in the ward and waiting room, not just in Covid. However, many of you have pointed out the difficulties that a doctor wearing a mask may present to people with deafness or those who are dependent on lip reading.

It is not recommended to wear a mask in the counseling or waiting room if it affects your communication skills or interferes with access to treatment.

Masks are only beneficial if they do no extra harm, and patients need to make a decision as to whether they feel affected in this way. However, if there are no problems, I think it is an easy way to control the infection.

Dr. Ellie Cannon: My wife’s snoring is terrible … Should I take pills and sleep?

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