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Do you have thousands of valuable antique phones?

New research suggests that it’s time to attack old cell phone drawers, cupboards, and storage boxes, as many can sit for thousands of pounds.

According to data from the online marketplace Love Antiques, the 10 most valuable old phones are worth more than £ 25,000 in total.

The prototype iPhone 1 is at the top of the list of most valuable “Antec” phones with an average value of £ 10,000.

The market is reporting a surge in people’s interest in “antech,” a technology of more than two generations.

Some older phones are considered antiques and are worth thousands of pounds online

The phone, which is most likely to be of huge value, is often the first model in the range, an unusual design, associated with an iconic movie, or made of luxurious materials.

Thomas of Love Antiques said: “It’s almost strange to think of mobile phones as antiques, as most people use them every day, but as outlined in the” antech “category, the pace of technological progress is approaching that for many. It means that the stage. ‘

He adds: “It’s no exaggeration to say that there are some weird and wonderful models out there. Many people today don’t even know they’re phones, but they can still be of immense value.

“The collection of technology is particularly interesting because it gives us a near-timeline of how technology has evolved over the years and how it continues to evolve with new advances.”

Below, Love Antiques has listed the top 10 most valuable Antec phones.

The price range was calculated using last year’s eBay sales and an expert evaluation of antique technology.

1. Prototype prototype iPhone 1- £ 10,000 +

If you have a prototype Apple iPhone 1, you can build thousands.

If you have a prototype Apple iPhone 1, you can build thousands.

The 2007 Apple iPhone was a major milestone in phone design and concept.

The New in Box 2G iPhone itself may currently be worth £ 2,000, but if you were lucky enough to get a prototype of the phone, you might have been lucky.

Prices vary considerably, but online auctions have previously known that real examples earn over £ 30,000.

However, keep in mind that there are many standard iPhones with prototype software installed and they are delivered as genuine.

2. Motorola8000x-£ 800 to £ 3,500

The Motorola 8000x was available from 1983 to 1994, took about 10 hours to fully charge and had a talk time of only 30 minutes.

Compared to today’s standards, phones are huge, but thought to be much less bulky than the cell phones commonly found in cars and briefcases.

These are often branded by different companies (such as BT) and are not always labeled on the front, so it’s worth learning how to find this collectable classic.

The phone sold for £ 3,000 new.

The Motorola 8000x could be used for 10 hours on a full charge from 1983 to 1994.

The Motorola 8000x could be used for 10 hours on a full charge from 1983 to 1994.

3. Nokia7700-£ 1,000 to £ 2,000

This phone is years old from the Motorola 8000x, but still worth thousands.

This is because the phone was not released properly even though it was prototyped between 2003 and 2004.

This was intended to be the first pen-based device, but was eventually canceled.

Only about 20 models were made to explain the high prices.

The phone wasn't released even though it was prototyped between 2003 and 2004

The phone wasn’t released even though it was prototyped between 2003 and 2004

4. Senator Mobira NMT-£ 800- £ 2,000

Arguably one of the largest mobile phones ever manufactured, the Mobira Senator NMT was launched by Nokia in 1981.

Weighing about 22 pounds, it is one of the heaviest devices.

Today, this is one of the rarest cell phones that has ever existed, explaining why some collectors are willing to pay up to £ 2,000 for part of their history. ..

For new purchases, these were estimated at £ 5,000.

Heavy Equipment: Senator Mobira NMT was launched in 1981 and weighed about 22 pounds.

Heavy Equipment: Senator Mobira NMT was launched in 1981 and weighed about 22 pounds.

5. IBM Simon Personal Communicator-£ 800 to £ 2,000

IBM Simon Person Communicator was released in 1994 as a handheld touch screen personal digital assistant.

We sold about 50,000 units in 6 months on the product market.

However, the battery lasted only one hour, and the flip smartphone was significantly smaller, so the battery was discontinued.

It was £ 539 when I bought a new one.

Due to the popularity of flip smartphones in the market, phones were quickly discontinued

Due to the popularity of flip smartphones in the market, phones were quickly discontinued

6. Nokia Sapphire 8800-£ 500 to £ 2,000

Manufactured as a luxury phone by Nokia in 2005, there were several variations, including a 24-carat gold-plated one.

The original comes with a scratch-resistant screen and weighs 134 grams.

This model came with a manufacturer-specified talk time of up to 1.5-3 hours per battery, or up to 8 days of standby time.

However, users say this is optimistic and in most cases requires the phone to be charged several times a day.

It is now one of the most popular used models to buy.

The device was new for £ 500.

Nokia unveiled the 8800 as a luxury model available in a 24-carat gold-plated version

Nokia unveiled the 8800 as a luxury model available in a 24-carat gold-plated version

7. Technophone PC105T-£ 600 to £ 1,500

Released in 1986, this was the world’s first pocket-sized cell phone, originally priced at £ 1,900, which was very expensive at the time.

It was funded by a grant from the UK Ministry of Trade and Industry, whose small size urged government policymakers to see the potential of the mobile phone mass market.

In fact, it was marketed to fit in your pocket, not your car or briefcase.

A model of the phone can be found at the Science Museum in London.

The phone was £ 1,990 new.

Check your cupboard: Technophone PC105T is now worth between £ 600 and £ 1,500

Check your cupboard: Technophone PC105T is now worth between £ 600 and £ 1,500

8. Orbitel Citiphone-£ 600 to £ 1,000

The Orbitel Citiphone was a classic brick phone from 1987 and is now rarely seen.

Initially sold for £ 999 and VAT, it was one of the first mobile phones at the time of launch.

Collectors need to fire between £ 600 and £ 1,000 to secure one.

The Orbitel Citiphone was one of the original brick phones and is currently worth up to £ 1,000.

The Orbitel Citiphone was one of the original brick phones and is currently worth up to £ 1,000.

9. Ericsson R290 Satellite Phone-£ 300 to £ 1,000

Released in 1999, it was one of the first satellite phones to allow friends and family to call even from the most inaccessible locations in the world.

It uses a foldable antenna that is the same length as the phone itself, and has a built-in modem for data and fax communication.

For UK users, the Vodafone GSM Sim card allowed them to access the Globalstar network.

They were estimated to be huge £ 2,000 new, but those who are now buying a model would be thinking of paying between £ 300 and £ 1,000.

The Ericsson R290 was one of the first satellite phones to be able to make calls around the world.

The Ericsson R290 was one of the first satellite phones to be able to make calls around the world.

10. RainbowStarTAC-£ 100- £ 400

Motorola released the StarTAC series in 1996 and was one of the first clamshell-designed phones.

The multicolor version has been released in limited numbers and is a great example of an early fashion phone.

The phone was new and cost £ 1,400, but collectors are now considering paying the model £ 100 to £ 400.

A limited number of multicolored versions of Motorola's StarTAC series have been released

A limited number of multicolored versions of Motorola’s StarTAC series have been released

What makes the phone more valuable?

Experts suggest that small factors such as branding, software, models, cult status, and rarity are several factors that can make a mobile phone valuable.

For example, the mobile at the top of the list (prototype iPhone 1) is known to get up to £ 30,000.

Unfortunately, many post-production iPhones have prototype software installed, which makes them much less valuable.

It is also important to know the general meaning of fake and genuine.

Looking at the technical items that can be collected, LoveAntiques experts say that the pace of technological progress is traditionally used terms such as “antique” (at least 100 years ago) and “vintage” (at least 20 years ago). I think it means that is inappropriate.

They define products with technologies older than two generations as “antech” and choose the recognizable Latin prefix “ante”. This means “before”.

5 popular mobile phones that can make you some cash

You can make a lot of money with the above phones, but it’s likely that one of the “classic” below is hidden and it’s well worth investigating their resale value.

• Nokia 3310: £ 20 to £ 50

• Motorola RAZR V3: £ 30 to £ 150

• Philips Savvy: £ 5 to £ 20

• Samsung Galaxy S: £ 10 to £ 50

• BlackBerry Curve: £ 20 to £ 120

According to experts, the RAZR is arguably the most visually iconic phone and the price will rise steadily.

However, Samsung and Blackberry, which are interesting, are currently the most common and will be left in the drawer for a few years.

Top tips for collecting mobile phones

• Check the status of the phone. You can receive more money by using the items in the original package and the original documents and accessories.

• Find unique selling points for your phone. Icon status and technical milestones are far more valuable than age alone.

• Understand the technology-Many older phones either don’t work or can’t connect to the network due to the battery. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but understand why the phone stopped working.

• Study Phones-The most important thing is to understand the differences between models that haven’t changed much. It can make a big difference in price.

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Do you have thousands of valuable antique phones?

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