Did Disney dump Tim Allen because he supports Donald Trump?

He was the living embodiment of the cartoon character, seemingly down and out before launching an impressive comeback that dazzled audiences across the world.

But Tim Allen appears to be finding his latest rebound harder than usual, having been overlooked to reprise the role of Buzz Lightyear in the spin-off movie.

The actor, 69, started life as a class clown who peddled drugs in Michigan before getting caught in an undercover sting operation.

He managed to turn his life around and quickly transformed into one of the most beloved actor’s to be pumped out of Hollywood.

Yet now he has been unceremoniously dumped by Disney and replaced by Marvel superhero Chris Evans in the role he breathed life into.

And there is growing concern among many that his endorsement of Donald Trump and attendance at the president’s inauguration was the root cause of it.

Others fear it could be down to a series of risky jokes on his social media pages that have put him at the mercy of the left-wing mob.

It comes at a time when Disney is being accused of going woke, having earlier this year gone to war with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis over his ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill.

Tim Allen (pictured in 2020) appears to be finding his latest rebound harder than usual, having been overlooked to reprise the role of Buzz Lightyear in the spin off movie

He has been unceremoniously dumped by Disney and replaced by Marvel superhero Chris Evans in the role he breathed life into (pictured, the new Lightyear film)

When it came to delivering Buzz’s famous catchphrase, ‘to infinity and beyond,’ Chris Evans said he copied Allen’s version (pictured)

‘This is like Thirties Germany’: Tim Allen tells Jimmy Kimmel what it’s like being pro-Trump in 2017

Asked about attending Trump’s inauguration by Jimmy Kimmel in 2017, he said: ‘You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody believes.

‘This is like Thirties Germany. I don’t know what happened. If you’re not part of the group, ”You know what we believe is right”, I go, ”Well, I might have a problem with that”. I’m a comedian, I like going on both sides.’

He added: ‘I literally don’t preach anything. What I’ve done is I’ve just not joined into, as I call it, the ”we culture”. I’m not telling anybody else how to live. I don’t like that.’

Allen also told Fox those who slam Trump in Hollywood are hypocrites, adding: ‘What I find odd in Hollywood is that they didn’t like Trump because he was a bully.’

‘But if you had any kind of inkling that you were for Trump, you got bullied for doing that. And that’s where this gets a little hypocritical to me.’

Allen appeared to have understood the position he was in, admitting he had a huge target on his back in Hollywood due to his right-wing politics.

Asked about attending Trump’s inauguration by Jimmy Kimmel in 2017, he said: ‘You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody believes.

‘This is like Thirties Germany. I don’t know what happened. If you’re not part of the group, ”You know what we believe is right”, I go, ”Well, I might have a problem with that”. I’m a comedian, I like going on both sides.’

He added: ‘I literally don’t preach anything. What I’ve done is I’ve just not joined into, as I call it, the ”we culture”. I’m not telling anybody else how to live. I don’t like that.’

Allen also told Fox those who slam Trump in Hollywood are hypocrites, adding: ‘What I find odd in Hollywood is that they didn’t like Trump because he was a bully.’

‘But if you had any kind of inkling that you were for Trump, you got bullied for doing that. And that’s where this gets a little hypocritical to me.’

Meanwhile the star has continued to test the waters on his social media page with a series of jokes that some have claimed are unacceptable.

Ahead of his new mini-series The Santa Clause in May, he wrote: ‘Prancer is getting groomed… you didn’t hear it from me.’

Earlier this week he posted: ‘Took some kids to Disneyland and overheard a 13-year-old boy wondering if he may be pansexual since he loves skillets.’

Allen was met with a horrified backlash, with one critic writing: ‘Imagine being the voice of a beloved animated character you’ve made a fortune from, and being so bitter about being recast that you’d take a cheap shot at children.’

Disney and Pixar have denied Allen lost his role in Toy Story and sitcom Last Man Standing due to his politics despite some reports.

But his friends and supporters have still blasted the companies for apparently tossing the beloved actor out to dry.

Everyone Loves Raymond star Patricia Heaton said: ‘Saw the trailer for Buzz Lightyear and all I can say is Disney/Pixar made a HUGE mistake in not casting my pal Tim Allen in the role that he originated, the role that he owns.’

She wrote in the tweet: ‘Tim IS Buzz! Why would they completely castrate this iconic, beloved character?’

Producer Galyn Susman added: ‘Tim really is the embodiment of the toy Buzz, and this isn’t the toy world, so it really doesn’t make sense.

‘There’s not really a role. It would just cause more confusion for audiences instead of helping them understand the movie we’re trying to tell.’

Captain America star Chris Evans (pictured) admits he was a little nervous about taking on the role of Buzz Lightyear made famous by actor Tim Allen in the 1995 hit Toy Story

Evans admitted earlier this week he was intimidated stepping into Allen’s shoes for the iconic role.

The 40-year-old confessed to copying the older actor with his trademark line: ‘To infinity and beyond.’

The Captain America star told the Daily Telegraph in Australia: ‘I just said, ‘I’m doing Tim and I don’t care”.

‘It makes you feel so nervous to hear yourself out loud – it almost feels wrong. It’s like trying to say ‘Bond, James Bond’ and you’re like ‘nope, nope, nope – that’s for someone else’.’

Evans’ character in the Toy Story spin-off is not quite the dimwit that Tim Allen played. In Toy Story, Buzz was merely a toy who thought he was an astronaut.

Lightyear, explains Evans, is supposed to be the movie the toy is based on.

In the plot of the new film, Buzz is a Space Ranger, marooned on a hostile planet, who tries to find his way home. The character is a bit smarter that the toy Buzz.

‘[Tim Allen] is Buzz Lightyear to me too – I grew up on these movies,’ Evans said.

‘So, you certainly want to use it as a template…And he did such a good job, I would be a fool to not absorb some of the choices.’

He added: But at the same time you have to kind of make some kind of fresh track in the snow.’ Disney and Pixar have been approached for comment.

Disney made the decision to ax its animated film Lightyear from cinemas in Malaysia after it refused to cut gay kissing scene that saw it banned in 13 other countries

Malaysia’s film censors said that it was Disney’s decision to ax the animated movie ‘Lightyear’ from the country’s theaters after refusing to cut scenes that ‘promote’ homosexuality.

Malaysia’s Film Censorship Board said it approved the movie with parental guidance for those under 13 on the condition that scenes and dialogues ‘found to contain elements promoting the LGBT lifestyle’ that violated guidelines were ‘cut and muted.’

But Disney apparently did not agree to the conditions and decided instead to cancel the screening, the board said, adding that it would not compromise on any LGBTQ scenes. 

The board’s statement did not specify which scenes violated censorship guidelines but the $200 million film includes a lesbian space ranger character, Alisha, voiced by actress Uzo Aduba, and her partner starting a family together and greeting each other with a kiss on the lips.

The scene in question reportedly shows the female lead in film voiced by actress Uzo Aduba, kissing her ‘female partner’ 

Malaysia’s Film Censorship Board said it approved ‘Lightyear’ with parental guidance for those under 13 on the condition that scenes and dialogues ‘found to contain elements promoting the LGBT lifestyle’ were ‘cut and muted’ 

Pixar’s ‘Lightyear’ has been banned in multiple counties due to the fact the animated film shows a same-sex kiss between two characters – a scene parent company Disney initially took out, but reinstated following complaints from offended staff

 Parent company Disney reportedly initially took out, but reinstated in March following complaints from offended staff

The scene had been originally cut from the film by Disney earlier this year bit it was reinstated in March after Pixar staffers complained about the censorship in an open letter obtained by Variety.

The letter criticized the company’s CEO Bob Chapek on his handling of the issue, accusing him attempting to censor ‘gay affection.’

The note further criticized his handling of Florida’s controversial ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill, which saw the company at first take a tentative stance on the bill before succumbing to public pressure and condemning it.

The bill bans the teaching of lessons on sexuality, gender identity and sexual orientation from kindergarten up to third grade.

Malaysia recently had similar qualms over gay scenes in ‘Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore’ and Elton John biopic ‘Rocket Man.’ 

Disney’s decision to not cut any LGBT scenes from the Toy Story spinoff comes after authorities across much of the Muslim world have barred ‘Lightyear’ from being played at cinemas because it includes a brief kiss between a lesbian couple.  

Many Muslims consider gays and lesbians to be sinful and many Muslim-majority nations criminalize same-sex relationships. 

As of Monday, a total of 14 countries- Malaysia, The UAE, Indonesia, Lebanon, Jordan, Bahrain, Egypt, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Palestine, Syria and Iraq- have barred citizens from seeing the film, set to hit theatres later this week.

The UAE – home to Abu Dhabi and Dubai – was the first to reveal they had banned the picture, which features actor Chris Evans voicing the inspiration for Tim Allen’s action figure Buzz Lightyear, made famous in the ‘Toy Story’ films. 

The country made the announcement through its Media Regulatory Office of the country’s Ministry of Youth and Culture, saying the film would not be opening Thursday, due to its violation of rules imposed on the nation’s media.

The film ‘is not licensed for public screening in all cinemas in the UAE, due to its violation of the country’s media content standards’, the office wrote.

The media watchdog further asserted that the ban was meant ‘to ensure the safety of the circulated content according to the appropriate age classification.’

The film was reportedly never submitted to censors in Saudi, due to producers’ assumptions that it would not pass because of the country’s outspoken disapproval of homosexuality.

The film has garnered controversy in the states as well, with many critics blasting the studio for trying to push a supposed ‘gay agenda’ to children. 

‘Disney works to push a ‘not-at-all-secret gay agenda’ and seeks to add ‘queerness’ to its programming, according to executive producer Latoya Raveneau. Parents should keep that in mind before deciding whether to take their kids to see ‘Lightyear,’ which hits theaters this week,’ Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro tweeted about the film. 

Another person tweeted that it should be up to parents whether or not kids are exposed to a lesbian kiss: ‘No reason for it to be in the movie. Kids need to be kids not see things that they later on will discuss with parents, When the parents decide too. I’m gonna continue to be picky about the disney movies my family watches kids don’t need to see that yet,’ 

‘Disney wishes the whole world would become Hollywood. Old Walt, frozen or not, must be SPINNING!!,’ someone else tweeted. 

While another person tweeted: ‘Remember when a Disney movie could just be an escape from the world? No political messaging. Just a simple escape.’

Disney has been branded hypocritical for voluntarily cutting ‘overtly gay affection’ from previous films to appease homophobic foreign governments.

DailyMail.com can reveal at least four recent feature films were altered to appease the views of leadership in China, Russia and the Middle East.

The company has previously kept moments of LGBT affection in its American films, but removed or changed them in its more conservative markets.

Pixar released Onward, an animated feature that tells the tale of two elf brothers who embark on a magical quest to spend time with their late father, in February 2020.

The film included a secondary character, Officer Spector, a cyclops cop for the city of New Mushroomton, who was in a lesbian relationship.

Officer Spector, voiced by Lena Waithe, mentions her relationship during a parenting discussion with another secondary character: ‘It’s not easy being a new parent – my girlfriend’s daughter got me pulling my hair out, okay?’

The line sparked outrage is several eastern countries, resulting in a ban of its release in Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia, Deadline reported.

Russia, which has a history of censoring gay content, changed the word ‘girlfriend’ to ‘partner’ in the parenting scene. Local advertisements for the film also avoided mentioning Officer’s Spector’s gender.

Disney has also been accused of cutting the majority of inclusive scenes in the 2022 Pixar film Turning Red. Several employees have called on the studio to ‘release the Gay Cut’ of the film

Pixar film Onward, which features a lesbian character named Officer Spector (pictured), was censored in Russia to change the character from having a ‘girlfriend’ to a ‘partner’

In Marvel’s Eternals, a same-sex kiss shared by Phastos and his husband, Ben Stoss, was edited out in the Arab Emirates, Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Ethiopia, Palestine, Syria and Turkey. The kiss is pictured above

Meanwhile, members of the LGBT community have heralded Officer Spector as Disney’s first openly gay character.

The Marvel franchise, which is owned by Disney, included a same-sex kiss in Eternals, a November 2021 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics race of the same name.

The character of Phastos, the inventor of the community of genetically-engineered Eternals, is married to a man named Ben Stoss. Together the pair raise a son, Jack.

In one scene, Phastos is seen kissing Ben. But, according to Out.com, that moment was edited out for audiences in the Arab Emirates, Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Ethiopia, Palestine, Syria and Turkey.

The countries did, however, keep other scenes in which Phastos interacts with his husband and son. It is unclear if the familial relations between the characters were defined.

Out.com notes that in addition to the same-sex kiss, all scenes of physical intimacy, including those depicting heterosexual relationships, were also removed from the film, which is standard practice in those countries.

Another Marvel film, Avengers: Endgame, which was released in 2019 and grossed nearly $3billion worldwide, was also censored abroad.

Early on in the film, there is a brief scene in which a gay character attends a support group meeting with Captain America.

‘So, I went on a date the other day. First time in five years,’ the character said, before adding later: ‘He cried as they were serving the salad. But I’m seeing him again tomorrow.’

It was the first time an openly gay character appeared in a Marvel film.

According to Russian newspaper TJournal, the nation’s dubbed version of Endgame changed the dialogue to remove ‘romantic overtones’.

In the Russian version, the charcater says: ‘I was recently at dinner. First time in five years. […] He cried over a plate of salad. […] Tomorrow I’m meeting him again.’

The newspaper also claimed Disney may have changed dialogue in Marvel’s 2018 film Avengers: Infinity War to avoid additional conflict with the Russian government, however it is unclear what the nature of the dialogue was.

Disney came out against Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis’s so-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill, whose official title is the Parental Rights in Education Bill, last month after being pressured by woke in-house diversity factions

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has been at the forefront of the culture wars with his state’s controversial ‘Parental Rights in Education’ law – which opponents call the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ law

Florida has become a key battleground, with conservatives turning on Disney because of the way it opposed a law banning school teachers from holding classroom discussion on sexual orientation or gender identity

Similarly, Pixar was accused of downplaying gay tones in its 2021 film Luca, which details the friendship of two young sea monsters who appear human when on land.

The monsters, Luca and Alberto, develop a ‘profound friendship’ that many interpreted as a ‘coming out allegory’.

The film’s director told The Wrap the studio had ‘talked about’ the monsters’ relationship being romantic, but also noted officials ‘didn’t talk about it as much’ because the film focuses ‘on friendship’ and is ‘pre-romance.’

What is the Parental Rights in Education law?

HB 1557 was introduced by two Republican members of the Florida Legislature – Representative Joe Harding and Senator Dennis Baxley.

They say the bill’s aim is to ’empower parents’ in their children’s education, and make teachers recognize the distinction between ‘instruction’ and ‘discussion.’

‘What we’re prohibiting is instructing them in a specific direction,’ Baxley said about how teachers lead students in a classroom. 

‘Students can talk about whatever they want to bring up, but sometimes the right answer is, ”You really ought to talk to your parents about that.”’

It states that ‘classroom instruction by school personnel or third parties on sexual orientation or gender identity may not occur.’

Part of it applies to kids in kindergarten through third grade, while a vague portion bans all discussion of ‘sexual orientation or gender identity’ in a ‘manner that is not age appropriate or developmentally appropriate.’

It also requires districts to ‘adopt procedures for notifying a student’s parent if there is a change in the student’s services or monitoring related to the student’s mental, emotional, or physical health or well-being,’ something LGBTQ advocates argue could lead to students being outed to their parents without the student’s knowledge or consent.

The state House approved the bill in February. It was passed in the state Senate on March 8 in a 22-17 vote. DeSantis signed it into law on March 28 and it will come into effect on July 1.

‘Some people seem to get mad that I’m not saying yes or no, but I feel like, well, this is a movie about being open to any difference,’ director Enrico Casarosa added.

Disney has reportedly refused to confirm if the pair were in a gay romance.

The films bosses are also accused of having toyed with the idea of making character Giulia, a human girl who befriends Luca and Alberto, a lesbian but decided against it because the creative team was ‘stymied by how to do it without also creating a girlfriend for the character.’

‘We very often came up against the question of, ‘How do we do this without giving them a love interest?” a production source told Variety. ‘That comes up very often at Pixar.’

Disney has also been accused of cutting the majority of inclusive scenes in the 2022 Pixar film Turning Red, which was a coming of age story about puberty.

Pixar employees allege there was misrepresentation in the animated film and that it was riddled with ‘ambiguous possibly gay hinting,’ according to InsideTheMagic.

Several employees have called on the studio to ‘release the Gay Cut’ of the film.

It is unclear what specifically the alleged gay scenes depicted, however critics have posted stills to social media of scenes in which two female characters have their faces just inches apart.

Disney came out against Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis’s so-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill, whose official title is the Parental Rights in Education Bill, last month after facing immense pressure from staff members.

The bill prohibits public school instruction on gender and sexuality between kindergarten and third grade.

Supporters say the bill, which was signed into law in March, stops teachers from pushing inappropriate content on children, which they believe students may be too young to understand.

Opponents say the bill is homophobic, and that the vagueness of its wording could see a teacher reported to authorities for something as minor as mentioning their same-sex partner in class.

Disney initially stayed quiet on the bill.

But the firm – which has long had a good track record on supporting its LGBT staff – is said to have waded into the issue after being pressured by woke in-house diversity factions now said to exert growing influence over bosses there.

CEO Bob Chapek later spoke out after walkouts by a small number of Disney staffers – and angered DeSantis by openly suggesting that his firm would apply pressure on lawmakers.

After blasting the bill, he said: ‘As I wrote to our employees earlier this week, we are committed to supporting community organizations like these so they are equipped to take on these fights.

‘Meanwhile, we are also reassessing our approach to advocacy, including political giving in Florida and beyond.’

From infinity to be-yawned! Buzz Lightyear spin-off is bereft of Toy Story’s dazzling wit and charm, writes BRIAN VINER in his two-star review

LIGHTYEAR:

Rating:

For those of us who adore the animated Toy Story films, expectations for Pixar’s new spin-off stretched comfortably to infinity and beyond. Maybe even further.

But my hopes were sent crashing to Earth within the first 15 minutes or so of yesterday’s advance screening and by the time the end credits rolled, I found myself reaching for a word never before used in conjunction with a Pixar movie, at least not by me. 

The film is set on a hostile planet millions of light years from Earth. Buzz (voiced by American actor Chris Evans) and his crew are forced to crash land there

I found Lightyear to be, yes, boring. In fairness, plenty of others disagreed. And there is still every likelihood that the celebrated battle-cry, ‘To infinity and beyond’, first popularised by space ranger Buzz Lightyear in the original Toy Story (1995), will indeed reflect the hopes of the accountants at Pixar’s parent company Disney. 

The film is projected to make a fortune at the box office. Yet from where I was sitting, Lightyear was largely bereft of the captivating wit and irresistible charm that enriches all four Toy Story pictures. 

That doesn’t mean it isn’t kissed with technical genius – some of the animation is spectacular.

But lifting Buzz out of his usual environment and depicting him as an actual astronaut in a wacky tale of travel through space and time somehow diminishes his strength as a character. 

Moreover, depriving him of his cherished companions from the toy box – the likes of Woody the cowboy and Mr Potato Head – means that he must effectively carry this movie on his own. 

Regrettably, not even his famously broad shoulders are quite up to it. Lightyear is billed as an ‘origin story’ and in a sense it is, because we are told at the beginning that this is the movie that made Buzz such a hero to young Andy, the owner of the iconic toys, all those years ago.

It is set on a hostile planet millions of, you’ve guessed, light years from Earth. Buzz (voiced by American actor Chris Evans) and his crew are forced to crash land there, and because Buzz considers it his own fault, he also assumes responsibility for getting them off.

‘To infinity and beyond’, first popularised by space ranger Buzz Lightyear in the original Toy Story (1995), will reflect the hopes of the accountants at Pixar’s parent company Disney. The film is projected to make a fortune at the box office

He duly becomes a test pilot, attempting to achieve ‘hyperspeed’, which is the only way for them to escape. But his test flights trigger a phenomenon called ‘time dilation’. 

This means that what seems like four seconds to him is in fact four years, so that by the time he gets back his commanding officer and dear friend Alisha Hawthorne (Uzo Aduba) has met the love of her life and is about to get married. 

The good folk at Pixar then flourish their right-on credentials by making Alisha’s spouse another female, with whom – one would assume via a sperm donor, although the animator sensibly leave that detail to the imagination – she later becomes a co-mother. 

This LBGTQ dimension has reportedly got the film banned from the UAE and other Muslim countries. I wish I could say it’s their loss.

With Alisha’s entire life span thus compressed, Buzz finds himself joining forces with her granddaughter Izzy (Keke Palmer), an aspiring space ranger hampered by ‘astrophobia’. 

Also in his gang is a robotic cat called Sox (Peter Sohn), who gets most of the film’s best visual gags as Buzz and co try to outmanoeuvre the menacing Emperor Zurg (James Brolin). 

As all die-hard fans will recall, Zurg first made an appearance as a Darth Vader mickey-take in Toy Story 2 (1999). 

Lightyear is billed as an ‘origin story’ and in a sense it is, because we are told at the beginning that this is the movie that made Buzz such a hero to young Andy, the owner of the iconic toys, all those years ago

Director and co-writer Angus MacLane certainly tries his very best throughout to pay homage to the original film and its sequels, however I fear much of Lightyear will zoom way over the heads of the age group still, presumably, intended as the target audience. 

I wouldn’t want to try explaining the plot to a nine-year-old, especially a metaphysical encounter between Buzz and his own older self. 

However, that’s not my main objection. Watching all four Toy Story films, I couldn’t stop spluttering with mirth. This time, alas, the bigger challenge was to suppress the yawns.

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