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Covid survivors at double risk of lung blood clots, US CDC study warns

Survivors COVID-19 Has twice the risk a Blood clotting In the lungs or respiratory condition, according to new research ᲩᲕᲔᲜ ‘ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Posted on Tuesday, U.S. Government Bureau Survey Adults between the ages of 18 and 64 are at risk for developing pulmonary embolism – a clogged artery – or other respiratory conditions such as chronic cough or shortness of breath.

One in five covidium survivors in this age range and one in four survivors over the age of 65 have experienced “at least one incident condition that may be attributed to a previous infection.”

With the growing number of Covid-19 infections, many patients are complaining of a post-infection condition or the onset of long-term symptoms that include a wide range of health problems.

However, more research is needed to better understand who suffers the most from the “long kovid”.

The study was based on the analysis of records of patients who had a corovirus infection from March 2020 to November 2021 and were observed for 30 to 365 days after infection, before the onset of health, or at the end of the period. .

The data were then compared with another control group to determine the probability of these conditions.

A CDC study suggests that Covid prevention strategies, as well as routine assessment for post-Covid conditions, are crucial in reducing the incidence in survivors.

However, it had some limitations as it did not provide for the vaccination status of the subjects.

Several studies in the past, including the CDC, have indicated that survivors of Covid may be at increased risk for health conditions and require extensive follow-up care.

To date, more than 80 million people in the United States have been infected with Covid-19 and more than a million have died from the virus.

Covid survivors at double risk of lung blood clots, US CDC study warns

Source link Covid survivors at double risk of lung blood clots, US CDC study warns

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