Entertainment

Christopher Stevens: There’s a chunky TV place like this-but it’s not in Beave

Why the ship crashes (BBC2)

evaluation:

The secret life of our pet (ITV).

evaluation:

Twitter is furious and threatens that the end of the BBC license fee in 2027 means the loss of everything great on TV, from Blue Planet to Peaky Blinders.

Of course, Beave’s natural history unit is second to none. And we all know better than ruining the Peaky £ ^ &% ing blinder.

But you’ll find that no one praises the virtue of a voting tax of £ 159 a year to pay Studge, who fills much of Beave’s schedule.

The real tort is that all viewers in the country are obliged to contribute to the creation of dross such as Stacey Solomon Repaints Your House and bike trips around Rutland in Monica Galetti.

Why Ships Crash (BBC2) falls directly into a category of programs that the BBC doesn’t need to create.

It was top heavy in the statistics and the details were frustratingly ambiguous.

This documentary sought to explain what happened last year when the container ship Evergiven ran aground on the Suez Canal, causing tailbacks across the world’s shipping lanes.

CHRISTOPHER STEVENS: Why Ships Crash (BBC2) falls directly into a category of programs that the BBC does not need to create. Top heavy in statistics and frustratingly ambiguous in detail (pictured from Why Ships Crash)

CHRISTOPHER STEVENS: Why Ships Crash (BBC2) falls directly into a category of programs that the BBC does not need to create. Top heavy in statistics and frustratingly ambiguous in detail (pictured from Why Ships Crash)

Christopher Stevens: Of course, there is a place for documentaries like this. That place is yesterday's channel inserted during a movie about a retired Broke restoring a Sherman tank in a barn.

Christopher Stevens: Of course, there is a place for documentaries like this. That place is yesterday’s channel inserted during a movie about a retired Broke restoring a Sherman tank in a barn.

However, the lack of footage from the accident and its aftermath meant that the accident had to be reproduced with cheap computer graphics.

A picture of a ship rushing to a sandy bank appeared to have been lifted from a PlayStation video game 20 years ago.

The story was mainly told by Talking Heads, including several who speak only Arabic.

No one appeared from Evergiven, but Second Officer Arnie Caponegro and the ship engineer Julian Kona behind them spoke about them.

They confirmed that the container ship was very large, and this was a very deadlock.

If you’re lucky, Evergiven may still be there if there wasn’t a Supermoon that caused the climax of the year.

With the exception of these two, the producer was anxious for the interviewee, so he spoke to a dissatisfied businessman who had been waiting for six containers with a refrigerator for a few weeks.

We didn’t know why the ship crashed, as official investigators haven’t released their reports.

The most likely theory is that the ship was too fast in strong winds and the bow wave zigzag the ship to the shore.

However, it was not established who was responsible for this and why it did not happen more often.

Instead, we monitored filler sequences for other disasters that occurred in completely different parts of the world under completely different circumstances.

Christopher Stevens: Our Pet's Secret Life (ITV) included a segment on how researchers teach rats to drive battery-powered racing cars. This proves something, but I'm too busy yelling at my wife, so I don't know what:'You have to come see this! These mice are driving a small car! (Photo: Three young children watching a hamster exercise with a plastic ball at The Secret Life of Our Pets)

Christopher Stevens: Our Pet’s Secret Life (ITV) included a segment on how researchers teach rats to drive battery-powered racing cars. This proves something, but I’m too busy yelling at my wife, so I don’t know what:’You have to come see this! These mice are driving a small car! (Photo: At The Secret Life of Our Pets, three young children are watching a hamster exercise with a plastic ball)

Border Collie Kazuza regularly participates in stunts with her owner's BASE jumper Bruno Valente (painted together in the secret life of a pet).

Border Collie Kazuza regularly participates in stunts with her owner’s BASE jumper Bruno Valente (painted together in the secret life of a pet).

Of course, such a documentary has that place. That place is on yesterday’s channel, inserted during a movie about a retired Broke restoring a Sherman tank in a barn.

The fact that it was aired by a British state broadcaster and paid for our license fee is more like a puzzle than the shipwreck itself.

Every ship has a mouse. If you want to avoid a collision in the future, you can let the rodents steer.

Our Pet’s Secret Life (ITV) included a segment on how researchers teach rats to drive battery-powered racing cars.

This proves something, but I’m too busy yelling at my wife, so I don’t know what:’You have to come see this! These mice are driving a small car! “

I also met Kazuza, a border collie who loves parachuting, and a Scottish Fold rabbit, who can drop miniature basketball online.

Hugh Bonneville’s narration guarantees that there is a scientific purpose behind all this, but he isn’t fooling anyone.

It’s just a collection of cute pets doing smart things. What more do you want?

Christopher Stevens: There’s a chunky TV place like this-but it’s not in Beave

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