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Cables for charging electric cars may be too short, the study suggests

According to a new report, car manufacturers are “cutting” consumers when it comes to cables that come standard with electric vehicles.

A study of 22 popular rechargeable cars sold in the UK found that some brands provide standard cables with a length of just 3.8 meters – about the same length as the car itself.

This makes them unsuitable for those who do not park on the street, and therefore relies on a public network, which often means that they can not park at a distance from the device, according to The Car Expert.

The study also found that some manufacturers require more than £ 600 for longer charging with higher performance, leading to the replacement of inadequate standard cables that come with cars.

Size matters: research has shown that some taps sold with EV have a length of less than 4m and are therefore not suitable for access to public chargers

An analysis of the various EVs already on the market showed that the new electric Fiat 500 alone – which costs just under £ 24,000 – has the shortest charging cable of all – 3.8 meters.

The second shortest, according to the car review aggregator, is the Mercedes EQC SUV for 70,000 pounds and two expensive Tesla – Model 3 (from 48,490 pounds) and Model Y (from 57,990 pounds) – 4 meters long.

The investigation added that significant additional costs (in some cases over £ 600) to replace charging cables are very unfair, given that electric cars are already much more expensive than their petrol or diesel counterparts.

The length of the charging cables is standard on popular new electric vehicles
Brand Model Cable type (s). Cable length Charging speed
Audi electronic throne Mode 2 6 m 2.3 kW
Mode 3 4.5 m 11 kW
Audi Q4 e-tron Mode 2 6 m 2.3 kW
Mode 3 4.5 m 11 kW
BMW i3 Mode 2 5 m ? kW
BMW i4 Mode 2 5 m ? kW
Mode 3 n / a 11 kW
BMW iX3 Mode 2 5 m n / a
Mode 3 n / a 11 kW
BMW iX Mode 2 5 m n / a
Mode 3 n / a 11 kW
Citroën ë-C4 Mode 3 n / a n / a
DS cars DS 3 Crossback Mode 3 n / a n / a
Fiat 500 e Mode 2 4.5 m 2.3 kW
Mode 3 3.8 m 11 kW
Ford Mustang Mach-E Mode 2 n / a n / a
Mode 3 n / a n / a
Honda is Mode 2 n / a 2.3 kW
Hyundai Ioniq 5 Mode 2 n / a n / a
Mode 3 5 m 10.5 kW
Hyundai Kona Electric Mode 2 n / a n / a
Mode 3 5 m 10.5 kW
Jaguar Pace Mode 2 n / a n / a
Mode 3 n / a 11 kW
Kia e-Niro Mode 3 5 m 10.5 kW
Kia EV6 Mode 3 5 m 10.5 kW
Mercedes-Benz EQA Mode 3 5 m 11 kW
Mercedes-Benz EQB Mode 3 5 m 11 kW
Mercedes-Benz EQC Mode 3 4 m n / a
Mercedes-Benz EQS Mode 3 5 m n / a
M.G Z. S. EV Mode 3 n / a 7 kW
Mini Electric Mode 2 6 m 2.3 kW
Nissan Letter Mode 3 6 m 7 kW
Peugeot e-208 Mode 3 6 m 7 kW
Polestar 2 Mode 2 7 m 2.3 kW
Renault Zoe Mode 3 6.5 m 22 kW
Too bad Enyaq iV Mode 3 6 m 135 kW
Tesla Model 3 Mode 2 4 m 2.3 kW
Mode 3 6 m 7.4 kW
Tesla Model Y Mode 2 4 m 2.3 kW
Mode 3 6 m 7.4 kW
Vauxhall Corsa-e Mode 3 6 m 22 kW
Vauxhall Mocha-e Mode 3 ? m ? kW
Volkswagen ID.3 Mode 3 6 m 11 kW
Volkswagen ID.4 Mode 3 ? m 11 kW
Source: The Car Expert – all data taken from the websites of manufacturers and press services as of June 2022
The analysis showed that the new electric Fiat 500 alone - which costs just under £ 24,000 - has the shortest charging cable of all - 3.8 meters

The analysis showed that the new electric Fiat 500 alone – which costs just under £ 24,000 – has the shortest charging cable of all – 3.8 meters

the second shortest standard charging cable, according to The Car Expert, is designed for the Mercedes EQC SUV for 70,000 pounds, its length is only 4 meters

the second shortest standard charging cable, according to The Car Expert, is designed for the Mercedes EQC SUV for 70,000 pounds, its length is only 4 meters

Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model Y

It has also been found that some Tesla cars have surprisingly short charging cables as standard

The study drew attention to the need to standardize charging cables to make the transition to electric vehicles as smooth as possible.

“If we want to encourage the transition to electric vehicles, manufacturers need to provide adequate cables as standard and reduce the cost of expensive cable replacements, especially because consumers can no longer enjoy the financial benefits of a government hybrid grant,” explains Stewart, editorial director of the review collection website. Messon.

“It sounds obvious, but your cable has to be long enough to get from the charger to the car, however some car companies still don’t meet that basic requirement.”

Many EV cables were also limited in how fast they could transmit electricity from the grid to the car, resulting in a longer charging time than specified by the manufacturers.

Most residential and commercial facilities can provide electricity to charge an electric vehicle at speeds ranging from 7 kW to 22 kW.

However, research has shown that many standard cables are only rated for power from 2.3 kW to 11 kW.

Short charging cables are not suitable for drivers without on-street parking who rely on a public network, which often means that they cannot park at a distance of the car from the device

Short charging cables are not suitable for drivers without on-street parking who rely on a public network, which often means that they cannot park at a distance of the car from the device

Manufacturers ’websites and brochures have been deemed useless or even misleading when it came to charging cable information, leaving potential buyers unaware of which cable would be supplied and whether it would meet everyday requirements.

“We were most impressed by how difficult it is to get useful information from car companies about EV charging, with some of the manufacturers we contacted even giving incorrect information.

“This creates confusion for customers trying to figure out if EV can fit their needs,” Mason adds.

He urged the industry to adopt a minimum standard for cable length and charging power: “We recommend that all new electric vehicles come with a Mode 3, Type 2 charging cable at least 6 meters long and capable of charging at least 22 kW.

“This will give customers the best possible results and also make EV confident in the future against improved charging infrastructure. This is an easy victory for car buyers, which the government can implement immediately. “

The vehicle subscription provider Mycardirect says it is also often at a disadvantage due to poor quality cables coming with new electric vehicles.

“We are all too aware of the current situation and the confusing information about EV for the consumer,” explains boss Duncan Chamley.

“EV manufacturers and changes in government grants and tax policies certainly do not promote consumer confidence without an agreed standard, even in simple elements such as charging cable.

“We’ve seen EV’s penetration into the Mycardirect fleet rise to 28 per cent – which is twice as much as EV’s penetration of the UK market, which is 14 per cent – however, I sympathize with those drivers who are trying to solve this problem on their own. The call for standardization is definitely timely. “

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Cables for charging electric cars may be too short, the study suggests

Source link Cables for charging electric cars may be too short, the study suggests

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