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British gymnasts accuse “obsolete and sexist” leotard rules of perpetuating “harmful ideals”

British gymnasts have blamed “obsolete and sexist” guidelines for leotards that are required to be worn when competing.

Jennifer Pinch, on behalf of Team GB London 2012 Olympics said Times The guideline for wearing leotards in competition is to “perpetuate a very harmful ideal.”

According to the current guidance released by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG), gym clothes during competition must be “elegant” with leg lengths not exceeding 2 cm.

German gymnast Sarah Voss (pictured) set the trend in a full-length bodysuit to compete in the 2021 European Gymnastics Championships in April.

It was after German gymnast Sarah Voss set the trend in full-length bodysuits to compete in the 2021 European Gymnastics Championships in April in support of traditionally worn leotards. is.

Immediately after her were Elizabeth Sites and Kim Buoy. They wore similar suits in the women’s all-round finals.

In a message shared to her Instagram account, Ms. Voss wrote that the decision to wear a full-length version of the leotard, called Unitard, was “close to the heart” of her team and “very proud” to wear it. I am.

“It feels good and still looks elegant. Why?’She wrote.

Gymnasts can choose to wear unitards at the European Championships, but they are traditionally worn for religious reasons and rarely see the style worn in high-profile competitions.

Jennifer Pinchis (pictured), who represented Team GB at the 2012 London Olympics, said the rules for athletic clothing are outdated.

Jennifer Pinchis (pictured), who represented Team GB at the 2012 London Olympics, said the rules for athletic clothing are outdated.

FIG states that gymnasts “can choose the outfit that they find most comfortable to compete with.”

Pinch, who co-founded a gymnast change campaign with former elite gymnast Claire Heaford, told the Times that the guidelines for leotards are outdated and “evidence of a sport that prioritizes aesthetics over athletics.” It was.

Consisting of parents of current and former gymnasts, coaches, and athletes, this campaign aims to raise awareness in gymnastics, end abusive coaching practices, and help those who have experienced abuse in the sport. I am active.

Elizabeth Sites (pictured) also chose Unitard during the competition

Elizabeth Sites (pictured) also chose Unitard during the competition

Kim Buoy (pictured) wore a similar suit in the women's allround final

Kim Buoy (pictured) wore a similar suit in the women’s allround final

Becky Downey, a British Olympic gymnast, said German team style choices could start the gymnastics trend, and clothing issues in competition were “always a problem for female gymnasts. ”

She told the Times that Unitard should help de-sexualize gymnastics and athletes should feel comfortable. [their] Performance without worrying about anything [they] It seems. ‘

The sport has been hit by allegations of sexual, emotional and physical abuse in many parts of the world, including the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia.

In the United States, former national team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison after being convicted of sexually assaulting more than 200 women.

In the United States, former national team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison after being convicted of sexually assaulting more than 200 women.

In the United States, former national team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison after being convicted of sexually assaulting more than 200 women.

Some survivors of his abuse have become home names and Olympic medalists.

In the UK, gymnasts talk about problems in sports such as eating disorders and distorted body images.

The German Confederation said that athletes wearing unitards are against “sexualization of gymnastics.”

The International Gymnastics Federation said athletes were able to wear unitards in “several years” of competition, citing rhythmic gymnastics as an example.

Sarah Foss (pictured) says she is very proud to wear Unitard at the competition.

Sarah Foss (pictured) says she is very proud to wear Unitard at the competition.

The gymnast added that he remembered that he could wear a one-piece leotard under his guidance.



British gymnasts accuse “obsolete and sexist” leotard rules of perpetuating “harmful ideals”

SourceBritish gymnasts accuse “obsolete and sexist” leotard rules of perpetuating “harmful ideals”

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