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Boris Johnson welcomes two-month ceasefire in Yemen civil war Political news

Boris Johnson welcomed the two-month ceasefire in Yemen as violence escalated this year during the country’s seven-year civil war.

The Prime Minister said that the agreement negotiated by the UN special envoy Yemen:It can end suffering.

“We now have the opportunity to finally bring peace and an end to humanitarian suffering. I urge all parties to work for a lasting political solution. “

UN envoy to Yemen Hans Grundberg has said the two warring parties will begin a two-month ceasefire at 7pm local time on Saturday, the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

He said the ceasefire would “give the Yemenis the necessary break from violence, alleviate humanitarian suffering and, most importantly, give hope that an end to this conflict is possible.”

Mr Grundberg added that the agreement “would not have been possible without international and regional support, for which I am grateful.” He said that it is very possible that the support will continue.

Yemen is now facing one of the worst humanitarian crises since the war, with the United Nations warning that more than 100,000 people have been displaced and two million civilians at risk.

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Yemeni Houthi rebels shoot in the air after claiming responsibility for 2019 attacks

How did the war start?

The official government of the Middle East country is supported by the coalition led by Saudi Arabia, which since 2015 has mainly used air strikes in the fight against the Houthi rebel group.

The Houthis have used drones and missiles to attack both Saudi Arabia and its ally the United Arab Emirates.

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More than 70 people have been killed in air strikes in Yemen in January

In a popular uprising in 2011, longtime authoritarian President Ali Abdullah Saleh handed over power to his deputy, but the new leader was overwhelmed by Yemen’s economic and security problems, with most of the military loyal to his predecessor.

The Houthis took advantage of his weakness, taking control of the northern province of Saada in 2014 and then the capital Sanaa, forcing the president to flee abroad in 2015.

Saudi Arabia, then other Arab countries, launched an air campaign to oust the Houthis in March 2015, fearing that a minority Muslim rebel group would take control of Yemen.

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Yemen “This escalation must stop,” said the United Nations

The United States, Britain, and France have all supported the coalition in terms of logistics and intelligence.

Since the beginning of 2022, fighting has intensified in the air between the Houthis and the “Saudi coalition”.

The UN says both sides have committed war crimes or both deny it.



Boris Johnson welcomes two-month ceasefire in Yemen civil war Political news

Source Boris Johnson welcomes two-month ceasefire in Yemen civil war Political news

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