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Actor Sam Neill, 74, has expressed support for “changing the date” on Australia Day.

Actor Sam Neill, 74, expresses his support for “changing the date” on Australia Day.


Kiwi actor Sam Neill has expressed his support for changing the date Australia day, Will be celebrated on January 26th.

A 74-year-old Jurassic Park star wrote a candid post on Instagram on Wednesday, saying, “I fully understand how uncomfortable it is for indigenous peoples.”

Below the Aboriginal flag photo, Sam said he understands why some people call Australia Day “Invasion Day.”

Remarks: On Wednesday, actor Sam Neill, 74, expressed his support for “changing the date” on Australia Day.

‘This wonderful flag. It’s free now. This day. Well, I think every country needs National Foundation Day. It’s time to get together and ponder, “he began.

‘But January 26th? After 65,000 years of history, they chose to commemorate one day about 250 years ago. That day, the British rudely dumped a number of White Blow prisoners in what is now Sydney.

He added: And if you are an indigenous people, you fully understand how uncomfortable it can be. Considering what follows. “

Candid Post: Below the Aboriginal flag photo, Sam said he understands why some people call Australia Day an

Candid Post: Below the Aboriginal flag photo, Sam said he understands why some people call Australia Day an “invasion day.”

He finished as follows. “It’s no wonder it’s called Australia Day, the Day of Invasion.”

Actress Rebecca Gibney and MAFS star Connie Clayden liked his post.

The Australian Day, held on the day the British Navy’s ship raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove, was called Waran by the Aboriginal people who lived fishing there and split between the young and old generations. Continue to do.

On January 26, millions of Australians gathered at beaches, backyard barbecues, and pubs, putting flags on their sunbathing shoulders to celebrate national holidays.

But for the country’s first inhabitants, this date marks the beginning of the painful and devastating effects of colonization on their culture since the first British fleet sailed to Sydney Cove in 1788. increase.

'But January 26th? After 65,000 years of history, they chose to commemorate one day about 250 years ago. That day, the British rudely dumped a number of White Blow prisoners in what is now Sydney.It's absurd,

‘But January 26th? After 65,000 years of history, they chose to commemorate one day about 250 years ago. That day, the British rudely dumped a number of White Blow prisoners in what is now Sydney.It’s absurd, “he wrote.

A recent study by Core Data found that “Australian generations and genders are separated in terms of their importance and calendar position for the day.”

Research consultants asked if people plan to celebrate, if they support moving the holidays to another day, and how their opinions have changed in recent years.

Overall, 54% of respondents said they would be celebrating this opportunity, 30% said they would celebrate Australia’s history and achievements, and 15% said it was “just because it was a holiday.”

More than two-thirds of respondents under the age of 26 say they will not celebrate on January 26, with just over 30% saying they will.

However, more than 80% of them support moving dates to improve relationships with indigenous peoples, as do more than 70% of people aged 27-41.

Support for the change in the elderly declined, with just over 30% of respondents between the ages of 56 and 75 and 25% of the elderly supporting the change in date.

Country Divided: Australia Day, held on the day the British Navy's ship raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove, was called Waran by the Aboriginal people who lived fishing there, younger and older. It continues to divide between generations.The photo shows a crowd of Australian Day protests in Sydney on Wednesday.

Country Divided: Australia Day, held on the day the British Navy’s ship raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove, was called Waran by the Aboriginal people who lived fishing there, younger and older. It continues to divide between generations.The photo shows a crowd of Australian Day protests in Sydney on Wednesday.

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Actor Sam Neill, 74, has expressed support for “changing the date” on Australia Day.

Source link Actor Sam Neill, 74, has expressed support for “changing the date” on Australia Day.

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