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Aaron Sorkin BLASTS The New Yorker’s ‘distorted’ profile of Jeremy Strong

Aaron Sorkin released a statement regarding Jeremy Strong’s controversial profile in The New Yorker through Jessica Chastain’s Twitter account on Friday.

The 60-year-old writer and director blasted the characterization of the 42-year old performer in a lengthy message where he defended the actor and expressed that he had been nothing but professional while working together.

The West Wing creator began his statement by writing that the profile’s author, Michael Schulman, had created a ‘distorted picture of Jeremy that asks us to roll our eyes at his acting process.’

Speaking out: Aaron Sorkin released a statement regarding Jeremy Strong’s controversial profile in The New Yorker through Jessica Chastain’s Twitter account on Friday

Sorkin pointed out that the writer had asked him to make several comments about the actor, of which only one was used in the piece itself.

He also noted that Strong was ‘not a nut…he builds himself an on-ramp so that he’s already started to give the performance by the time the director calls “action.”‘

The writer did recall, however, that the performer asked to experience the effects of tear gas during the filming of The Trial Of The Chicago 7, which he had to shoot down.

Sorkin expressed that the actor was only interested in eliciting a solid performance and was not trying to place anyone else working on the project in danger.

Defensive: The 60-year-old writer and director blasted the characterization of the 42-year old performer in a lengthy message where he defended the actor and expressed that he had been nothing but professional while working together; Strong is seen earlier this month

Defensive: The 60-year-old writer and director blasted the characterization of the 42-year old performer in a lengthy message where he defended the actor and expressed that he had been nothing but professional while working together; Strong is seen earlier this month

Dedicated: He also noted that Strong was 'not a nut...he builds himself an on-ramp so that he's already started to give the performance by the time the director calls "action"'

Dedicated: He also noted that Strong was ‘not a nut…he builds himself an on-ramp so that he’s already started to give the performance by the time the director calls ‘action”

‘Jeremy would never suggest endangering a member of the cast or crew or anyone else. It was something he mentioned in passing and I was telling the story affectionately and as a way of demonstrating his commitment,’ he wrote. 

He concluded his message by writing that ‘Jeremy Strong is a great actor and a great company member. There isn’t a writer, director or producer on Earth who wouldn’t grab at the chance to cast him.’ 

Brian Cox previously voiced his concerns for his Succession co-star in the wake of the profile’s release. 

Talented: He concluded his message by writing that 'Jeremy Strong is a great actor and a great company member. There isn’t a writer, director or producer on Earth who wouldn’t grab at the chance to cast him'

Talented: He concluded his message by writing that ‘Jeremy Strong is a great actor and a great company member. There isn’t a writer, director or producer on Earth who wouldn’t grab at the chance to cast him’

With the Succession Season three finale days away, fans have been talking about the intense methods utilized by Jeremy, who plays troubled Kendall Roy, after he was the subject of the piece.

Earlier in the week, Chastain took to Twitter to defend Strong, stating he was, ‘a lovely person’ and ‘very inspiring & passionate about his work’ and hitting out at the ‘one-sided profile’. 

Despite her defense, during an appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers on Thursday, his on-screen father Brian, who plays Logan Roy, expressed concern over his ‘obsessive’ techniques and voiced concern he would ‘burn out’. 

Concerned: Brian Cox has voiced his concerns for his Succession co-star Jeremy Strong in thwake of a profile about his intense acting methods during anm a

Concerned: Brian Cox has voiced his concerns for his Succession co-star Jeremy Strong in the wake of a profile about his intense acting methods during an appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers on Thursday

In the profile, Jeremy revealed he does not see the hit show as a comedy – a revelation that appears to have baffled his peers. 

Speaking to The New Yorker, the actor, 42, detailed the method-style of his acting -including claims about taking the role as seriously as his own life, while also appearing stunned that fans and colleagues see the humour in the dark comedy. 

Brian, 75, confirmed is much different from his and others in the cast: ‘The thing about Jeremy’s approach is it works in terms of what comes out the other end’, he said, adding he doesn’t have a ‘problem’ with Jeremy.

Profile: With the Succession Season three finale days away, fans have been talking about the intense methods utilized by Jeremy, who plays troubled Kendall Roy, after he was the subject of a controversial profile in The New Yorker

Profile: With the Succession Season three finale days away, fans have been talking about the intense methods utilized by Jeremy, who plays troubled Kendall Roy, after he was the subject of a controversial profile in The New Yorker

Unique: He said Strong is 'delightful' and, 'one of the best fathers I've ever come across,' adding he's, 'a pretty unique individual'

Unique: He said Strong is ‘delightful’ and, ‘one of the best fathers I’ve ever come across,’ adding he’s, ‘a pretty unique individual’

He said Jeremy is ‘delightful’ and, ‘one of the best fathers I’ve ever come across,’ adding he’s, ‘a pretty unique individual.’

Still, Brian added, ‘He does get obsessed with the work. And I worry about what it does to him, because if you can’t separate yourself — because you’re dealing with all of this material every day.’

‘You can’t live in it. Eventually, you get worn out,’ Cox added, before bringing up another famous ‘method’ actor who retired early, Daniel Day-Lewis, who is listed as one of Jeremy’s acting idols in the profile. 

‘Like, to me, Daniel Day-Lewis got worn out at 55 and decided to retire because [he] couldn’t go on doing that every day. It’s too consuming’. 

Obsessed: Still, Cox added, 'He does get obsessed with the work. And I worry about what it does to him, because if you can’t separate yourself — because you’re dealing with all of this material every day'

Obsessed: Still, Cox added, ‘He does get obsessed with the work. And I worry about what it does to him, because if you can’t separate yourself — because you’re dealing with all of this material every day’

He said he does, ‘worry’ about the toll it takes on his co-star, but still, ‘the result — what everyone says about Jeremy — the result is always extraordinary and excellent.’

Brian’s fears were also referenced in The New Yorker piece. 

His on-screen father again admitted he fears for Jeremy’s process, saying: ‘The result that Jeremy gets is always pretty tremendous. I just worry about what he does to himself. I worry about the crises he puts himself through in order to prepare.’ 

His words come after Jessica tweeted on Tuesday that the interview was ‘one-sided’ and referred to it as ‘snarky’ after the eye-opening article caused a fevered reaction.

Worries: His on-screen father Brian Cox (pictured) admitted he fears for Jeremy's process, saying: 'The result that Jeremy gets is always pretty tremendous. I just worry about what he does to himself. I worry about the crises he puts himself through in order to prepare'

Worries: His on-screen father Brian Cox (pictured) admitted he fears for Jeremy’s process, saying: ‘The result that Jeremy gets is always pretty tremendous. I just worry about what he does to himself. I worry about the crises he puts himself through in order to prepare’ 

Worn out: 'You can’t live in it. Eventually, you get worn out,' Cox added, before bringing up another famous 'method' actor who retired early, Daniel Day-Lewis

Worn out: ‘You can’t live in it. Eventually, you get worn out,’ Cox added, before bringing up another famous ‘method’ actor who retired early, Daniel Day-Lewis

‘I’ve known Jeremy Strong for 20yrs & worked with him on 2 films,’ she wrote. ‘He’s a lovely person. Very inspiring & passionate about his work.’ 

‘The profile that came out on him was incredibly one sided. Don’t believe everything you read folks. Snark sells but maybe its time we move beyond it,’ she added. 

They worked together on 2012’s Zero Dark Thirty and 2017’s Molly’s Game. 

Jeremy and Brian wrap up Season 3 of Succession on Sunday night with the season finale, with HBO renewing the show for a fourth season in October. 

Last year, Jeremy spoke about how taking on the role of drug-addicted, power hungry Kendall took its toll on him due to his acting method. 

He told The Times’s T2 that playing the damaged sensitive child of a primitive master of the universe doesn’t get a lot of lightness, so nor does he. 

Toll: He said he does, 'worry' about the toll it takes on his co-star, but still, 'the result — what everyone says about Jeremy — the result is always extraordinary and excellent'

Toll: He said he does, ‘worry’ about the toll it takes on his co-star, but still, ‘the result — what everyone says about Jeremy — the result is always extraordinary and excellent’

He said: ‘Last season everything was in such a minor key, and held inside in a silent anguish that had to be sustained for six months…

‘I don’t think I’ve ever cared more or put more into a piece of work — it means so much to me. I feel like I’m getting to play one of the great antiheroes of our time.’ 

Also on Thursday, Brian spoke about his character Logan Roy’s catch phrase, ‘F**k off,’ and how fans often ask him to say it to them, and it happens ‘all the time.’

Great things: 'It's one of the great things to say to somebody, cause they'll come up to you and say, "Uh, could you say F**k off?"' Cox said with a laugh

Great things: ‘It’s one of the great things to say to somebody, cause they’ll come up to you and say, ‘Uh, could you say F**k off?” Cox said with a laugh

‘It’s one of the great things to say to somebody, cause they’ll come up to you and say, ‘Uh, could you say F**k off?” Cox said with a laugh.

He added one time he was in Los Angeles for the Golden Globes, and he went to an event with Rosanna Arquette where Ronan Farrow was reading from his book.

Brian regaled: ‘He finishes and they give him a round of applause and then they turn around and they see me and they all come out me and take out their device out and they say, ‘Can you tell me to f**k off?’

‘And you go, This is a MeToo meeting… and I am a white dinosaur. Something doesn’t seem right.’

MeToo: 'He finishes and they give him a round of applause and then they turn around and they see me and they all come out me and take out their device out and they say, "Can you tell me to f**k off?" And you go, This is a MeToo meeting... and I am a white dinosaur. Something doesn't seem right'

MeToo: ‘He finishes and they give him a round of applause and then they turn around and they see me and they all come out me and take out their device out and they say, ‘Can you tell me to f**k off?’ And you go, This is a MeToo meeting… and I am a white dinosaur. Something doesn’t seem right’

Aaron Sorkin BLASTS The New Yorker’s ‘distorted’ profile of Jeremy Strong Source link Aaron Sorkin BLASTS The New Yorker’s ‘distorted’ profile of Jeremy Strong

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